10 Ways To Cut Your Cancer Risk

10 ways to cut your cancer risks

We’re learning more about the lifestyle factors that protect against cancer, so here are smart steps you can take to reduce your risk.

Though there is no anti-cancer diet, growing evidence suggests that our food choices can help protect our bodies from cancer.

Foods that are high in antioxidants and fibre, such as fresh vegetables, fruit, whole grains and legumes (e.g.chickpeas and lentils) can reduce cancer risk

Alan Barclay Dietitian and Chief Scientific Officer of the Glycaemic Index Foundation

Foods such as white bread, pastries and potatoes are best minimized as they increase your levels of blood glucose. And this makes the body pump out more insulin.

Cancers related to our diet are often found in the digestive tract, including the oesophagus, stomach and bowel,says the Cancer Council. Other lifestyle factors such as smoking, weight gain and sun exposure may also contribute to cancer risk.

This hormone increases cell growth and decreases cell death, which raises the risk of developing some types of cancer.

Cancers related to our diet are often found in the digestive tract, including the oesophagus, stomach and bowel,says the Cancer Council. Other lifestyle factors such as smoking, weight gain and sun exposure may also contribute to cancer risk.

1. Maintain a healthy weight​

Being overweight increases your risk of developing bowel and breast cancer (after you reach menopause), as well as cancers of the endometrium, kidney and oesophagus.

So, it’s important that you regularly monitor your weight. Your GP can assess your body mass index (BMI), where a score of over 25 is classed as being overweight. And, your waist circumference should be below 94cm (for men) and below 80cm (for women).

The main risk factor

A diet that’s rich in antioxidants is better protection against cancer than any vitamin tablet. And it’s actually the combination of the nutrients found in food that appears to boost your body’s defences against cancer. “Supplements are no substitute for healthy, whole foods,”

2. Follow the plant plan

eating seven or more servings of vegetables and fruit every day

via Anelka – pixabay

Vegetables are packed with vitamins, minerals and fiber. And eating seven or more servings of vegetables and fruit every day has been found to reduce risk of death from any cause (including cancer) by 42 per cent.

Research by Loma Linda University in California, US has found that vegetarians enjoy a 22 per cent lower risk of colon cancer.

Vegies also offer protection against lung cancer, one of the most common cancers (with many cases unrelated to smoking). “A very low intake of fruits or vegetables is linked to a three-fold increased risk of lung cancer,” says Barclay. “And foods like berries, citrus fruits, tea, dark chocolate and red wine are high in flavonoids, which may also reduce lung cancer risk.”

3. Limit Your Saturated Fats

Limit your saturated fats

via Mediatations

If you eat a large amount of saturated fats from red meat and full-fat cream and cheese, you may bump up your risk of developing cancer of the breast, pancreas, prostate, and bowel, shows research.

“There is a particular link between red meat and certain bowel cancers, and processed meats such as bacon, ham and sausages increase risk the most,” explains Barclay. “This may be because they contain a preservative called nitrate that irritates the gut.”

The Cancer Council suggests that you eat red meat no more than two or three times a week, choose lean cuts and small portions, and eat more chicken, fish and pulses as protein sources. Processed meats should not be eaten more than once a week.

The good news!

After cancer diagnosis, people are surviving much longer and are in better health. 

4. Get Moving

Hitting the gym, pounding the pavement or lapping the pool may be protective against colon, breast, pancreatic, endometrial and prostate cancer, shows research

via Pexels

Hitting the gym, pounding the pavement or lapping the pool may be protective against colon, breast, pancreatic, endometrial and prostate cancer, shows research.

Some studies estimate that a more active lifestyle may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer by 40–50 per cent, and lead to a 30–40 per cent risk of breast cancer.

Dr Catherine Granger Physiotherapy at The University of Melbourne and Royal Melbourne Hospital

“To reduce cancer risk, many organisations like the American Cancer Society recommend adults include a minimum of 150 minutes of moderate intensity exercise per week or 75 minutes of vigorous intensity exercise per week.

5. Watch your alcohol Intake

Drinking any type of alcohol (beer, wine or spirits) increases the risk of developing cancer of the bowel, mouth, pharynx, larynx, liver, oesophagus and breast. The more alcohol you consume, the greater your risk of developing cancer.

If you do choose to drink, follow the National Health and Medical Research Council guidelines and limit your intake to two standard drinks a day. Women should be aware of evidence that just one drink a day could increase their risk of breast cancer.

6. Stop Smoking

Stop Smoking

via Myriams

Tobacco smoke contains more than 7000 chemicals, and over 70 of them are known to cause cancer, says the Cancer Council. As soon as you quit, there are immediate and long-term health benefits. 

7. Don’t rely on Supplements

Don't rely on supplements

via stevepb

Supplements lack the diverse range of phytonutrients that are found in food, and it’s the combination of these nutrients that appears to boost your body’s defences against cancer.

“Supplements may also have unexpected impacts,” warns Barclay. “In one study, male smokers were given beta-carotene supplements.These ended up increasing the risk of cancer,which was an unexpected result. This is a good reminder that supplements are no substitute for healthy, whole foods.”

8. Check your bill

Taking the contraceptive pill has been linked to a slightly increased risk of breast cancer (of about one additional case per year for every 100,000 women), show research published in The Lancet medial journal.

However, studies also show some protective effects against cancers of the ovaries and endometrium. See your GP to discuss your risks in relation to your age, lifestyle and family history

9. Don’t be afraid of Soy foods

Don't be afraid of soy foods

via Jing

Based on current evidence, moderate consumption of soy foods, as part of an overall healthy diet, is unlikely to have any harmful effects for most people, says the Cancer Council. However, women who have breast cancer should avoid a diet high in phytoestrogens, found in soy, as the safety of soy in relation to breast cancer is still not clear,” says Prof Aranda.

Earlier detection

As well as advances in treatment and research, “the improvements in cancer survival rates are also due to early detection from better screening programs, such as those now in place for cervical, bowel and breast cancer,” Prof Aranda explains. So, keep up-to-date with your scheduled check-ups

10. Up your fibre

doctors may prescribe high-fibre diets to boost healthy gut bacteria

via stevepb

In the future, doctors may prescribe high-fibre diets to boost healthy gut bacteria. A healthy bacteria balance may help prevent and treat cancer, shows a growing body of studies, including research from the University of California.

“While all fibre is beneficial, resistant starch is a type of fibre that is particularly helpful. This is because the beneficial bacteria in the colon uses it as food,” says Dr Jane Muir, Head of Translational Nutrition Science in the Department of Gastroenterology at Monash University. According to the CSIRO, good sources of resistant starch include chick peas, oats and bananas.

Fibre-rich foods are an important part of cancer prevention

Checking for changes in your Breasts

Get to know the usual look and feel of your breasts so that you notice any differences. Check regularly for any changes by:

  • Using the flat pads of your fingers and small circular movements, touch your breasts up to the collar bone and out to the underarm. Do this while you are showering and also when lying down.
  • Place your hands by your sides and check your breasts in a mirror, looking for changes in color, size or shape, any dimpling of the skin, ‘pulling in’ of the nipple or unusual discharge.
  • Check your breasts at the same time each month (preferably 2–3 days after your period ends or on the first Monday of each month if you no longer menstruate). If you notice any changes in your breasts, have them checked by your doctor. And don’t skip regular professional examinations by your GP or screening mammograms.

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