24+ Types Of Ivy Plants With Pictures

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Ivy plants with facts

There is a long list of plants that you could grow and one of them is the Ivy plant.

When treated right and grown with care, it could be a source of good oxygen inside the home and when its leaves grow lush and way too vine-y, you could grow it outdoors.

As an evergreen vine, it will be good as ground or wall cover and if these have stirred your interest about this plant, you are in for more as we discuss the different types of ivy that you could grow. 

Contents

Types of Ivy plant with picture and facts

A Quick Guide To the Ivy Plant

Ivy is an easy to grow, popular, and enduring houseplant. Here is an overview of the Hedera, or “True Ivy” family.

There are several types of Ivy, including Swedish Ivy, English Ivy, and Devil’s Ivy (Pothos). In this article we’ll talk about English Ivy (Hedera) which is considered “true” ivy. These plants are vigorous climbers that will happily climb up walls, posts, and even wallpaper.

This is the kind of Ivy often found covering the sides of buildings. Hedera also makes a lovely hanging plant and the smaller varieties can be used as ground cover for large potted plants. Hedera comes in a variety of leaf shapes from pointed to ruffled and is often variegated in shades of cream, gray, and yellow.

Hedera prefers bright indirect light and cool temps. Keep moist during the growing season and cut back during the winter, watering only enough to keep the soil from drying out.

They will complain in dry hot air, resulting in brown leaf tips, dried out leaves, and sometimes spider mites. Regular misting or humidity trays are the solutions. They will not do well in rooms where the temperature doesn’t fall below 60 at night.

To keep plants bushy, trim the growing tips every so often. Pot up the cuttings or place them in a jar of water and they will soon root and become new plants. Hedera can be easily trained to grow around whatever support is provided for it.

Here are some common problems and what to do about them:

Brown leaf edges/Spindly Growth

This indicates the plant is getting too much warmth. Check for spider mites. Cut back bare stems and move to a cooler location.

Variegated Variety Reverting to All Green

This indicates too little light. Variegated plants need bright light to keep their colors.

Undersized Leaves

Again, this indicates too little light.

Leaf Drop

It is normal for leaves at the base to drop with age. Other causes could be transplant shock or watering with cold water.

Grey or White Powder on Leaves or Soil

This is a sign of overwatering. The powdery substance is mildew. If it’s on the soil, it can be scraped off with a spoon. For mildew on leaves, the only cure is removal. Once the affected leaves are removed, increase air circulation around the plant and cut back on watering. If the stems appear brown or mushy, rot may have set in and it could be too late to save the plant.

Ivy facts, uses, problems, and dangers

Before we provide details for the types of ivy, it is fundamental that we know the basics about this plant first.

The ivy plant is more famed as English ivy so as not to mistake it from the poison ivy. The ivy plant is known for its glossy, dark green, thick and lobed leaves with yellow and white veins.

It thrives in cold, low light areas and is endemic to North Africa, West Asia, North America, Canada and the whole of Europe. Its scientific name is Hedera helix and through the years have had a reputation, good and bad.

On one hand, it is loved because it makes a natural and attractive cover for gardens and walls. On the other hand, it is aggressively weeded out because it is considered as an invasive weed due to its adaptability even with less to no care. 

It also has a fair share of uses, problems and dangers. For one, it has a long list of medicinal properties rooting to as early as the ancient Greek civilization.

As far as scientific researches are concerned, the ivy plant has been tagged as anti-inflammatory, can be used as treatment for respiratory conditions such as asthma and bronchitis and is rich in antioxidants.

As a plant, it is known to have an effect in improving oxygen circulation at a faster rate than other plants. However, it comes with a bargain because the ivy plant has a long history of being an allergen giving you conditions such as dermatitis, skin swelling, skin irritation and shortness of breath.

When ingested, ivy could be toxic causing diarrhea, vomiting and even neurological conditions due to its toxic content called glycoside hederin. 

What is the best climbing ivy?

If by best we mean the most sought-after climbing ivy plants for brick walls and ground cover then we could say that we have two, chosen by popular demand: the English ivy and the Boston ivy.

Both are self-climbing, very fast to grow and have distinct attractive characteristics. The English ivy of course bear grape-like fruits while the Boston ivy transforms into a fiery red color during winter. 

Is Ivy a good indoor plant?

If grown outdoors, it could get out of hand but when cultivated and taken care indoors, the ivy could be one of the best indoor plants.

With enough light, water and constant care, an indoor ivy is considered as one of the most beautiful indoor plants especially when potted in hanging containers and have the leaves cascade down on the porch. 

Does ivy kill other plants?

The answer to this is yes. As have been mentioned, they are fast growing and can adapt to harsh environments even with little or no care at all. And because they tend to cover ground, they could easily suffocate other plants growing around them as they compete and disbalance the distribution of nutrients in the soil, eventually killing off other plants. 

What is the difference between poison ivy and ivy?

At first glance, one would not be able to distinguish the poison ivy and the ivy. Well, they both have hairy stems but the leaves will give and fruits will give it away.

Poison ivies can be identified through its three glossy leaves that are spoon-shaped and have tooth-like edges. In the summer, these three leaves will hold creamy white fruits (in clusters). In the spring, the leaves will turn red, and in the fall, they become yellow/orange.

The ivy on the other hand has three to five lobed leaves, with white and yellow veins, a starburst like flower in the summer and black-blue fruits with fleshy exterior and dark, hard seeds in the fall. 

What does poison ivy look like?

To elucidate and give face to what we are talking about when we talk of poison ivy, here is what it looks like. 

Poison Ivy plant

On the other hand, this is how an ivy plant looks like. 

Hedera Helix plant

Is Ivy poisonous to humans?

Yes. As have been mentioned, it is quite harmful for people with existing allergies. It is also toxic when ingested so it must always be out of reach especially to kids.

It can cause diarrhea, vomiting, nausea and more dangerous conditions such as coma, seizures and others when ingested in a significant volume. 

Is Ivy poisonous to cats and dogs?

This is also a resounding yes and it is because of the reasons also aforementioned. It is one of those indoor plants that could really do harm to cats and dogs instantaneously causing swelling, diarrhea, vomiting, excessive salivation and even death. 

Do Ivy plants clean the air?

In a research published by NASA in 1997, the ivy plant was listed as one of the best indoor plants that can act as organic air purifiers for the home.

Specifically, ivy plants could clear the air of harmful substances namely xylene, toluene, benzene and formaldehyde. It is also one of those indoor plants that could improve and make oxygen circulation move at a faster rate (especially during the night). 

What is the fastest growing ivy?

You would be surprised that it is the Boston ivy which is considered as the fastest growing ivy.

It takes only four to seven days for it to creep longer and cascade lower. Its favorite hangout would be buildings where it could grow for up to 60feet in no time.

It could tolerate both extreme heat and extreme cold unlike its more famous English ivy cousin who could only tolerate moist, woodland areas, partial sun and partial shade. Indeed, the Boston ivy is an urbanite. 

Is English ivy edible?

Of course not. The fact that it is associated with mild to fatal medical conditions is enough manifestation that the English ivy is in no way edible for both humans and pets. 

Types of ivy plants indoor

The ivy plant is a favorite indoor plant because it is easy to grow and it is low maintenance. For it to achieve good growth, it needs six straight hours of sunlight, watering thrice a week and houseplant fertilizer once a month.

It can be transferred indoors by being dug and replanted in indoor hanging pots during spring or fall. Here are some of the most beautiful ivy variants that you could have as indoor plants. 

#1. Duckfoot ivy (Hedera Helix ‘Duckfoot’)

Hedera Helix 'Duckfoot' ivy

It is named as such because of its distinct small, rounded, fan shaped leaves resonating small duck feet. It is low maintenance and hardy, drought tolerant and self-branching. It is good for groundcover, in banks and in sloped terrains. 

  • Botanical Name: Hedera helix ‘Duckfoot’
  • Common name: Ivy Duckfoot; Duckfoot English Ivy
  • Plant type: Vine
  • Mature size: 1 – 1.5 meters
  • Sun exposure: Full sun, partial shade, full shade 
  • Soil type: Chalk, Loam
  • Soil pH: Acidic, Alkaline, Neutral
  • Bloom time: Summer
  • Flower color: White
  • Hardiness zones: 5-11
  • Native Area: USA, Canada, Europe and West Asia

#2. Buttercup ivy (Hedera helix ‘Buttercup’)

Buttercup ivy (Hedera helix 'Buttercup')

It is an evergreen vine known for its broad, slightly lobed, yellow leaves in full sun and pale green in shade and aerial roots. It is good for flower garden borders, coastal cottages and as container plants. 

  • Botanical Name: Hedera helix ‘Buttercup’
  • Common name: Buttercup ivy
  • Plant type: Vine
  • Mature size: 1 – 2 meters
  • Sun exposure: Full sun, partial shade, partial sun
  • Soil type: Sand, chalk, clay, loam
  • Soil pH: Acidic, Alkaline, Neutral
  • Bloom time: Fall
  • Flower color: Yellow green
  • Hardiness zones: 4B-6
  • Native Area: Ireland 

#3. Shamrock ivy (Hedera Helix ‘Shamrock’)

Shamrock ivy (Hedera Helix 'Shamrock')

It was first called the Cloverleaf ivy but was named as such to honor the Shamrock Hotel where it was first introduced. It is a beautiful container plant known for its near symmetrical three lobed leaves with two lobes overlapping the terminal lobe.

It is dark green white yellow green veins. It is self-branching and grows in heavy mounds. 

  • Botanical Name: Hedera helix ‘Shamrock’
  • Common name: Shamrock ivy
  • Plant type: Shrub, vine
  • Mature size: 0.5 – 1 meter
  • Sun exposure: Full sun, partial shade, full shade
  • Soil type: Chalk, clay, sand, loam
  • Soil pH: Neutral, slightly acidic, slightly alkaline
  • Bloom time: Late summer, fall, winter
  • Flower color: Green
  • Hardiness zones: 5-10
  • Native Area: Britain, Ireland, Northwest Asia

#4. Manda’s crested (Hedera Helix ‘Manda’s Crested’)

Manda's crested (Hedera Helix 'Manda's Crested')
Source

It is a medium-climber evergreen distinct for its broad, five-lobed, dark green leaves with wavy margins. Its foliage is dark green in the summer, silver gray in the fall and changes to tinged bronze in the winter when it is sheltered.

It could be propagated using semi-hardwood cuttings in the summer. 

  • Botanical Name: Hedera helix ‘manda’s crested’
  • Common name: Manda’s crested, Curleylocks/curlilocks
  • Plant type: Vine, climber, shrub 
  • Mature size: 9 – 12 meters
  • Sun exposure: Full sun, partial shade, full sun
  • Soil type: Loam, chalk
  • Soil pH: Mild acid, mild alkaline and neutral
  • Bloom time: Late fall, early winter
  • Flower color: Green
  • Hardiness zones: 5-11
  • Native Area: Australia, Central Europe, West Asia

Types of ivy ground cover

We are more familiar with the ivy plant as ground and wall covers. They mostly thrive in cottage banks, sloped areas and in garden patios.

However, some ivy plants make better ground covers than others and here are some of them. 

#1. Baltic ivy (Hedera Helix ‘Baltica’)

Baltic ivy (Hedera Helix 'Baltica')

It is a fast-growing ivy with the ability to withstand even the harshest winter. It is used as a ground cover as well as for screening and hedging for both shaded and sunny areas.

It is a woody perennial with small, glossy, dark green foliage with white veins in the summer and purplish-black in the winter. 

  • Botanical Name: Hedera helix ‘Baltica’
  • Common name: Baltic ivy, Algerian ivy, California ivy, Needlepoint ivy, Sweetheart ivy
  • Plant type: Vine (trailing), ground cover
  • Mature size: 0.5 – 1 meter
  • Sun exposure: Full sun, partial shade, full shade
  • Soil type: Normal, sandy, clay
  • Soil pH: Neutral, alkaline, acid
  • Bloom time:  Fall, summer
  • Flower color: Gold/yellow, deep green
  • Hardiness zones: 5-12
  • Native Area: North America and the Baltic regions

#2. Bush ivy (Fatshedera Lizei)

Bush ivy (Fatshedera Lizei)

It is a hybrid propagated by crossing Japanese fatsia (Fatsia japonica) and Hedera helix. It is tolerant not only with harsh climates but also to environmental conditions such as coastal sea spray and pollution.

Being the hybrid of a shrub and a vine, it is used not only to cover ground but to be an indoor plant as well. It is generally disease resistant with margined five-lobed leaves. 

  • Botanical Name: Fatshedera lizei
  • Common name: Bushy ivy, Tree ivy, Fatshedera
  • Plant type: Vine, shrub, ground cover, houseplant
  • Mature size: 1 – 1.5 meters
  • Sun exposure: Partial shade
  • Soil type: Neutral, slightly alkaline
  • Soil pH: Acid
  • Bloom time: Fall
  • Flower color: Green/white
  • Hardiness zones: 7b – 10a
  • Native Area: Europe, North America

#3. Russian ivy (Fallopia baldschuanica)

Russian ivy (Fallopia baldschuanica)

It is a vigorous, fast-growing plant and is highly invasive. It is ideal for wide spaces that you want to cover.

On top of its immanent pitfall, it has a lovely, wide spreading, glossy, heart-shaped, green foliage in the summer and copper bronze in the fall and fleece like, white flowers.

It must be pruned every Spring. Overall, it is generally tolerant to all types of climates. 

  • Botanical Name: Fallopia baldschuanica
  • Common name: Russian ivy, Devil’s ivy, Fleece flower, mile a minute plant, silver lace vine
  • Plant type: Vine, climber
  • Mature size: 12 meters
  • Sun exposure: Full sun, partial shade, full shade
  • Soil type: Sandy, loam
  • Soil pH: Acid, neutral and alkaline
  • Bloom time: Summer, fall
  • Flower color: White 
  • Hardiness zones: 4a-8a
  • Native Area: Central China, Tibet and Tadzhikistan, most of Europe and North America

Read also: How to care for Black Swedish Ivy

Types of ivy plants outdoors

Ivy plant cultivars are mostly outdoor plants because they are essentially used for ground cover. But through propagation, they could be replanted and taken cared of to grow as shrubs. Here are some of the ivy plants that you could grow beautifully outdoors. 

#1. English ivy (Hedera Helix)

English ivy (Hedera Helix)

It is a common ornamental plant used as groundcover and propagated both indoors and outdoors.

It is called the common ivy because it has more than 400 cultivars including most of the ivy plants featured here.

They are known for their 3-5 lobes, waxy and alternating with lighter green veins and are considered as a woody perennial. 

  • Botanical Name: Hedera helix
  • Common name: English ivy, common ivy
  • Plant type: Vine, houseplant, weed
  • Mature size: 15 meters
  • Sun exposure: Partial sun, full sun, partial shade, full shade 
  • Soil type: Clay, loam, sand, shallow rocky
  • Soil pH: Slightly acidic, slightly alkaline and neutral
  • Bloom time: Fall, summer
  • Flower color: Greenish white, gold/yellow
  • Hardiness zones: 4-9
  • Native Area: Europe, Scandinavia, Russia

#2. Irish ivy (Hedera Hibernica)

Irish ivy (Hedera Hibernica)

It is endemic in Ireland and most of Europe. It is known for its margined, dark green, glossy five-lobed leaves with pale green undersides.

It is a vigorous grower and is considered as a smothering, invasive plant in Ireland. It is however, useful as a ground cover and when propagated could make a beautiful outdoor plant. 

  • Botanical Name: Hedera hibernica
  • Common name: Irish ivy, Atlantic ivy
  • Plant type: Vine, climber, ground cover
  • Mature size: 8 – 12 meters
  • Sun exposure: Full sun, full shade
  • Soil type: Chalk, clay, sand, loam
  • Soil pH: Acidic, alkaline, neutral
  • Bloom time: Fall
  • Flower color: Yellow
  • Hardiness zones: 5-11
  • Native Area: British Isles, Ireland, Baltic regions and Scandinavian countries

#3. Algerian ivy (Hedera Algeriensis)

Algerian ivy (Hedera Algeriensis)

It is shade loving and fast growing. It is a reliable ground cover and could survive even the harshest weather conditions.

It is loved as an outdoor and indoor plant because of its variegated varieties of pale green, silver gray and creamy white. It is good as trellis, ground cover and is helpful in controlling soil erosion making it famous in the coasts of California. 

  • Botanical Name: Hedera algeriensis
  • Common name: Algerian ivy, Canary ivy
  • Plant type: Vine, shrub
  • Mature size: 6 meters
  • Sun exposure: Full shade, partial sun
  • Soil type: Sand, chalk, loam
  • Soil pH: Neutral, slightly acidic
  • Bloom time: Spring
  • Flower color: Light green
  • Hardiness zones: 6-11
  • Native Area: North Africa, Canary Islands

#4. Japanese ivy (Hedera Rhombea)

Japanese ivy (Hedera Rhombea)

It is a woody climber with purple stems and glossy, green foliage with red margins. The leaves are also shaped like rhombus, hence, its botanical name.

It has variegated cultivars with cream margins and streaks instead of red. It also produces yellow, clustered flowers followed by black-blue fruits. 

  • Botanical Name: Hedera rhombea; Hedera, pedunculata; Parthenocissus tricuspidata
  • Common name: Japanese ivy
  • Plant type: Vine, evergreen wood climber, shrub
  • Mature size: 9 meters
  • Sun exposure: Partial to full sun, partial shade
  • Soil type: Clay, sand, loam, shallow rocky 
  • Soil pH: Moderately acidic, slightly alkaline, neutral
  • Bloom time: Fall
  • Flower color: Yellow/green 
  • Hardiness zones: 4-8
  • Native Area: East Asia, China, Japan

#5. Persian ivy (Hedera Colchica)

Persian ivy (Hedera Colchica)

It is distinct for its large leaves spanning to up to 10 inches making it the largest ivy plant 

type. It has both variegated and solid color cultivars. It is slightly drought tolerant but prefers more shade and loves moist soil making it a good outdoor plant. It is also fast growing, making it necessary to prune regularly. 

  • Botanical Name: Hedera colchica
  • Common name: Colchica ivy, Persian ivy
  • Plant type: Vine, ground cover
  • Mature size: 3 – 3.5 meters
  • Sun exposure: Partial to full shade
  • Soil type: Loam with high organic matter
  • Soil pH: Slightly alkaline, neutral
  • Bloom time: Fall
  • Flower color: Green/white
  • Hardiness zones: 5a-9a
  • Native Area: West Caucasus region, Northern Turkey

#6. Himalayan ivy (Hedera Nepalensis)

Himalayan ivy (Hedera Nepalensis)

It is a ground creeping, woody vine with deep green lobed leaves in its juvenile stage and unlobed leaves and umbel flowers as it matures.

It was widely sold as a potted indoor/outdoor plant before it became known as decorative ground cover. Being endemic in the Himalayas and high-altitude zones, it is tolerant to the cold but is sensitive to heat. 

  • Botanical Name: Hedera nepalensis
  • Common name: Himalayan ivy, Nepalese ivy
  • Plant type: Vine, shrub, ground cover
  • Mature size: 30 meters
  • Sun exposure: Partial to full shade
  • Soil type: Clay, sandy
  • Soil pH: Alkaline, neutral
  • Bloom time: Summer, fall
  • Flower color: Yellow
  • Hardiness zones: 7-10
  • Native Area: Nepal, Central, Southeast Asia and Micronesia

#7. Boston ivy (Parthenocissus tricuspidata)

Boston ivy (Parthenocissus tricuspidata)

Although it is clustered along the ivy plants, it is actually a false ivy and belongs to the grape family, Vitaceae. But because of its three lobed leaves, it is lined in the Hedera family.

It is considered deciduous and loses a lot of leaves in the fall after a full display of bright red and purple foliage. It will bloom green flowers in clusters and blue grape fruits.  

  • Botanical Name: Parthenocissus tricuspidata
  • Common name: Boston ivy, Grape ivy
  • Plant type: Vine, ground cover
  • Mature size: 15 meters
  • Sun exposure: Full sun, partial shade
  • Soil type: Clay, sand, loam, shallow rocky
  • Soil pH: Moderately acidic, slightly alkaline, neutral
  • Bloom time: Summer, spring
  • Flower color: Gold/yellow, white
  • Hardiness zones: 4-8 
  • Native Area: East Asia

#8. Swedish ivy (Plectranthus australis)

Swedish ivy (Plectranthus australis)

They are not good as creepers but they are good for ground covers or as bedding plants. It loves moist soil and does not want full sun. It is known for its dark green, ovate leaves with purple undersides and toothed margins. 

  • Botanical Name: Plectranthus australis
  • Common name: Swedish ivy, Mona lavender
  • Plant type: Shrub, herbaceous perennial
  • Mature size: 0.5 – 1 meter
  • Sun exposure: Partial shade
  • Soil type: Loam with high organic matter
  • Soil pH: Slightly alkaline, neutral
  • Bloom time: All throughout the year
  • Flower color: White and purple/lavender
  • Hardiness zones: 9-11
  • Native Area: Northern Australia and the Pacific

#9. Canarian ivy (Hedera canariensis)

Canarian ivy (Hedera canariensis)

Being one of the cultivars of common/English ivy, it is highly similar with the Algerian ivy making them considered one and the same.

It is a perennial woody vine that is fast growing and is used for ground cover and can be cultivated as outdoor shrubs. It has wider leaves than the English ivy though and it grows in forests so it really loves the shade. 

  • Botanical Name: Hedera canariensis
  • Common name: Canary ivy, Algerian ivy
  • Plant type: Vine, shrub, ground cover
  • Mature size: 3 meters
  • Sun exposure: Partial sun, partial shade, full shade
  • Soil type: Sand (silt), loam, chalk
  • Soil pH: Acidic, alkaline, neutral
  • Bloom time: Fall, summer 
  • Flower color: Whitish green
  • Hardiness zones: 7-12
  • Native Area: Canary Islands, Northwest Africa

#10. Cyprus ivy (Hedera cypria)

Cyprus ivy (Hedera cypria)

It could grow very tall, a perennial climber and good for ground cover. It has a deep green, triangle shaped, unlobed, gray veined leaves and red stems.

It is slow growing which makes it controllable and good for propagation as indoor and outdoor plant. It is considered as one of the rarest types of ivy. 

  • Botanical Name: Hedera cypria
  • Common name:  Cyprus ivy
  • Plant type: Vine
  • Mature size: 20 – 30 meters
  • Sun exposure: Full sun, partial shade
  • Soil type: Clay, sand, loam
  • Soil pH: Moderately acidic, slightly alkaline, neutral
  • Bloom time: Winter, spring
  • Flower color: White, lilac
  • Hardiness zones: 9b-11a
  • Native Area: Cyprus, Israel, Lebanon

#11. Pastukhov’s ivy (Hedera pastuchovii)

Pastukhov’s ivy (Hedera pastuchovii)

It is another rare ivy type with glossy, blackish green heart shaped leaves, wavy margins and gray veins all throughout the year.

It is endemic to limestone filled areas and is not winter hardy. It is low maintenance and is good for ground cover, trellis and walls. 

  • Botanical Name: Hedera pastuchovii
  • Common name: Pastukhov’s ivy, Ann Ala
  • Plant type: Vine, climber 
  • Mature size: 1.5 – 2.5 meters
  • Sun exposure: Full sun, partial to full shade
  • Soil type: Clay, loam, sand, chalk
  • Soil pH: Mildly acidic and alkaline, neutral
  • Bloom time: Summer
  • Flower color: Yellow
  • Hardiness zones: 5
  • Native Area: Iran, Greater Caucasus 

#12. Azores ivy (Hedera azorica)

Azores ivy (Hedera azorica)

It is a trailing vine that could grow in any type of environment from full sun to full shade. It has large, alternating leaves with green stems. It is also a woody shrub and a perennial bush. It is a good ground cover in sloped areas. 

  • Botanical Name: Hedera azorica
  • Common name: Azores ivy
  • Plant type: Vine, climber, ground cover, bush
  • Mature size: 30 meters
  • Sun exposure: Full sun, partial to full shade
  • Soil type: Slightly sandy and heavy clay
  • Soil pH: Slightly acidic, moderately alkaline and neutral
  • Bloom time: White, yellow green
  • Flower color: Summer, fall
  • Hardiness zones: 5-10
  • Native Area: Azores Islands

#13. Atlantic ivy (Hedera hibernica)

Atlantic ivy (Hedera hibernica)

It is commonly associated with Irish ivy but it is recognizable for its broader and longer leaves (but shorter terminal lobe).

At first the bark is green but will become gray as it matures.  It is considered as an evergreen perennial and typically climbs in damp and shady areas. 

  • Botanical Name: Hedera hibernica
  • Common name: Atlantic ivy
  • Plant type: Vine, climber
  • Mature size: 30 meters
  • Sun exposure: Full sun, partial to full shade
  • Soil type: Chalk, clay, loam, sand
  • Soil pH: Slightly acidic, moderately alkaline, neutral
  • Bloom time: Fall
  • Flower color: Green
  • Hardiness zones: 5
  • Native Area: Atlantic coast, Scandinavia, Baltic region

#14. Iberian ivy (Hedera iberica)

Iberian ivy (Hedera iberica)

It is a perennial climber with aerial roots. It has broad, lobed, leathery leaves with green, red and purple stems. It is endemic in the Iberian Peninsula typically in sloped terrains and tree trunks. It is good for ground covering with no vertical surfaces. 

  • Botanical Name: Hedera iberica
  • Common name: Iberian ivy
  • Plant type: Perennial vine
  • Mature size: 20 – 30 meters
  • Sun exposure: Partial to full shade
  • Soil type: Sand, loam, chalk
  • Soil pH: Moderately acidic, alkaline, neutral
  • Bloom time: Summer, winter and fall
  • Flower color: Green, yellow
  • Hardiness zones: 7b-9a
  • Native Area: Northern Morocco, Portugal, Southwest Spain and the rest of the Iberian peninsula

#15. Madeiran ivy (Hedera maderensis)

Madeiran ivy (Hedera maderensis)

It was originally a subspecies of the Iberian ivy. It is considered as a perennial shrub with aerial roots. It is similar to the Iberian ivy with its broad, leathery leaves expanding to 9 inches. It is good for ground cover especially for sloped terrains. 

  • Botanical Name: Hedera maderensis
  • Common name: Madeiran ivy
  • Plant type: Vine, shrub
  • Mature size: 30 meters
  • Sun exposure: Partial to full shade
  • Soil type: Sand, loam, chalk
  • Soil pH: Moderately acidic, alkaline, neutral
  • Bloom time:  Summer, fall
  • Flower color: White/yellow, green
  • Hardiness zones: 7-9
  • Native Area: Madeira Island

#16. Common ivy (Hedera helix; Hedera communis)

Common ivy (Hedera helix; Hedera communis)

It is the most common ivy type planted in Europe and North America. It is similar to the English ivy with its glossy, dark green, lobed three-leaflet leaves.

It is a vigorous climber on both vertical and non-vertical surfaces. It is considered as a weed that will smother other plants if uncontrolled. It is one of the best ground covering plants that you can tap. 

  • Botanical Name: Hedera helix; Hedera communis; Hedera poetica
  • Common name: English ivy, Glacier ivy, Branching ivy
  • Plant type: Vine, ground cover
  • Mature size: 6 – 24 meters
  • Sun exposure: Full sun, partial to full shade
  • Soil type: Clay, Loam (silt), sand
  • Soil pH: Acidic, slightly alkaline, neutral
  • Bloom time: Fall
  • Flower color: Greenish white
  • Hardiness zones: 4-9
  • Native Area: Europe, Scandinavia, North America

#17. Morocan ivy (Hedera maroccana)

Morocan ivy (Hedera maroccana)

It is a good ground cover for non-vertical surfaces. It is closely related to Hedera hibernica but unlike it, it beds and roots faster especially in warm climates.

It could also be propagated to grow as outdoor shrubs or indoor plants. It is commonly found climbing on tree trunks and rocky surfaces. 

  • Botanical Name: Hedera maroccana
  • Common name: Moroccan ivy
  • Plant type: Vine, shrub
  • Mature size: 20-30 meters
  • Sun exposure: Full sun, partial to full shade
  • Soil type: Chalk, clay, loam, sand
  • Soil pH: Slightly acidic, moderately alkaline, neutral
  • Bloom time: Fall
  • Flower color: Green
  • Hardiness Zones: 5 – 7
  • Native Area: Morocco, Canary Islands, Northern Africa

Conclusion

Without a doubt, there is so much more about the ivy plant than the obvious toxicity that has continued to haunt its reputation.

The ivy is not dangerous as long as you do not touch the parts where it is toxic or allow it to be touched or ingested by pets and kids, among others.

As an indoor plant, it not only beautifies the home with its cascading leaves but also serves as a natural air purifier and hastens oxygen cycle.

As an outdoor plant, it is an attractive wall or ground cover.

Overall, it is a fast-growing, very low maintenance plant and given this pool of information that we have for it, there is no wonder as to why people like you are falling in love with it.

Have any questions or comments about Ivy? Stop by our discussion area and post them! It’s also a great place to get to know other houseplant lovers!

 

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