How to Grow an Indoor Tabletop Garden

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When the snow is on the ground and spring seems to be far away, growing an indoor garden gives a natural and soothing feel to a winter-bound interior.

Growing an indoor container garden is nothing new and can be very simple. Whether using cold-treated bulbs or planting grass seeds, a garden can be yours within a few days.

Bulbs to Grow

Cold-treated bulbs can be purchased at nurseries or garden centres and the variety is large. Tulips, daffodils, hyacinths, lilies, narcissi are just a few of the most types of bulbs available. Read the instructions for forcing bulbs carefully.

Growing a Floral Bulb Container Garden

The quickest and easiest way to enjoy a beautiful display of flowering bulbs is to purchase a few pots. Nurseries, garden centres, and even local supermarkets carry irises, grape hyacinths, tulips, hyacinths, narcissi, crocuses, and miniature daffodils at this time of year. Look for plants that are just beginning to flower.

When transplanting bulbs from their plastic containers, wear garden gloves or wash your hands thoroughly after handling the bulbs as they may have been treated with fungicide.

To transplant the flowering bulbs:

  1. Fill the container 1/2 or 2/3 full of potting soil and moisten thoroughly.
  2. Remove bulbs from original pot and gently pull apart. Insert bulbs into the new pot as close as possible without touching.
  3. Add more soil around the bulbs and dampen soil well.
  4. Place in a sunny window and in a day or so, flowers will appear.

Grasses to Grow

If buying lawn grass seeds at your local garden centre or hardware store, look for seed packets marked partial or full shade seeds. These do much better indoors than regular grass seeds. You can also grow more exotic grass seeds such as winter rye, wheatgrass, oats, flax, barley, and, of course, cat grass (your feline pets will love you!).

How to Grow an Indoor Grass Garden

NOTE: Use a fast draining potting mix, like cactus mix.

  1. Place some screen mesh at the bottom of your pot to prevent leakage. Add some marbles, broken pieces of Styrofoam, or small stones for drainage .
  2. Add the soil, leaving about an inch from the top of the pot and level it off.
  3. Water the soil very well so the seeds or bulbs have a moist bed to lie in.
  4. Sprinkle the grass seeds generously over the soil.
  5. Sprinkle a little more soil over the seeds or around the bulbs; then use a mist spray bottle to keep the soil moist for the next few days.
  6. Keep the soil moist and within a few days you will see little sprouts.
  7. Keep your pots or containers where these will get some sun or at least good light, and don’t let the plants dry out.

Containers for an Indoor Container Garden

Almost any type of container can be used for your indoor garden. Some creative gardening containers include tea or cookie tins, wooden butter boxes or wicker baskets (both lined with plastic).

Whatever container you use, just make sure that there is enough drainage, as neither bulbs or grass like ‘wet feet.’

Displaying an Indoor Container Garden

Now that you have your garden, here are some ways to display it:

  • Vintage metal pots or baking pans make an attractive statement in the kitchen.
  • Place a row of smaller planters down the middle of your dinner table for an intriguing centerpiece.
  • Fill the back of a toy truck with plants or grass and use as a whimsical doorstop..
  • Line up a row of small clay pots along windowsills or a patio door.
  • Place one or two pots next to the sink in the bathroom for a simple still life.

Indoor Tabletop Garden Ideas

#1. Vintage herb garden

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#2. Easy Countertop Herb Garden

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#3. Tabletop jungle

#4. Mini succulent

#5. Tabletop moss garden

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#6. Industrial tiered tabletop succulent garden

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#7. Beach Bum Terrarium

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#8. Indoor cat garden

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#9. Salad bowl garden

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#10. Tabletop fountain garden

#11. Indoor water garden

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#12. Tabletop container

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Growing an indoor garden will keep you busy and your mind off the weather. Once spring has arrived, you can transplant your bulbs into your garden for next season. If you have any grass seeds left over, you can use these on your lawn.

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I am founder of FarmFoodFamily blog, where you can read about all living things. I have been a writer all my life, a collector of various interesting and old things, a traveler and an artist. Hobby and career paths have gone in many directions, from making miniature furniture to watercolor painting, fundraising for a symphony orchestra to selling antiques, from interior decorating to copyediting, from being a wife and mother to being a caregiver for family members with serious illnesses. Throughout the years I have learned and taught about all of these things and have been eager to share the information with a wider readership.

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