Quartz vs. Solid Surface (Corian) Countertops: What’s the Difference?

When it comes to countertops, there are a lot of choices to make. Do you want granite? Marble? Laminate? One of the newer options on the market is quartz countertops. But what’s the difference between quartz and solid surface countertops? In this blog post, we will explore the differences between these two types of countertops and help you decide which one is right for you!

Quartz countertops.

They are one of the hardest minerals on Earth, making them ideal for countertops. They are also non-porous, meaning they resist stains and bacteria. And they come in a wide variety of colors and patterns.

But there are also some downsides to quartz countertops. They can be expensive, starting at around $60 per square foot. And they’re not heat-resistant, so you can’t put hot pans directly on them.

Solid surface countertops.

What are solid surface countertops?

Solid surface countertops are made from a variety of materials, including acrylic, polyester, and quartz. They are stain-resistant and easy to clean, making them a popular choice for kitchens and bathrooms. Solid surface countertops can also be customized to any shape or size, making them a versatile option for home renovation projects.

Pros of solid surface countertops:

-They are very easy to clean and maintain.

-They are also heat resistant, which is a plus if you do a lot of cooking.

-They come in a variety of colors and patterns, so you can find one that fits your style.

-They are also fairly affordable, especially when compared to other countertop materials.

Cons of solid surface countertops:

– They can be quite expensive.

– They are not as heat resistant as other materials like granite or quartz.

– They can be scratched or damaged easily.

-They are not as stain resistant as other materials like granite or quartz.

Quartz countertops vs. solid surface countertops

Appearance.

When it comes to appearance, quartz countertops have a more uniform look since they are man-made. Solid surface countertops have a more natural look since they are made from natural materials.

Quartz countertops are available in a wide range of colors and patterns. Solid surface countertops are available in a limited number of colors and patterns.

Color.

It’s one of the most important factors to consider when choosing a countertop material. And when it comes to quartz and solid surface countertops, there are some big differences.

Quartz countertops come in a wide range of colors, from classic white and black to more unique shades like blue, green, and even pink. And because they’re man-made, you can find quartz countertops in just about any color you can imagine.

Solid surface countertops also come in a wide range of colors, but because they’re made from natural materials, the colors are more limited. You’ll find mostly earth tones like white, black, brown, and gray.

Price.

Quartz countertops cost more than solid surface countertops. On average, quartz countertops cost $50-$100 per square foot installed, while solid surface countertops cost $35-$65 per square foot installed.

So, if you’re looking for a cheaper option, solid surface is the way to go. However, keep in mind that quartz is a more durable option, so it may be worth the extra cost in the long run.

Composition.

Quartz countertops are made from natural quartz, while solid surface countertops are made from a mixture of acrylic and polyester resins. Quartz is harder than solid surface, so it’s more durable and less likely to scratch or stain. However, solid surface is less heat-resistant than quartz, so it can scorch more easily.

Quartz is also less susceptible to damage from household cleaners than solid surface. However, both materials can be damaged by strong chemicals, so it’s important to use mild cleaners and avoid abrasive scrubbers.

Seam Visibility.

One of the key factors to consider when choosing between quartz and solid surface countertops is seam visibility. With quartz countertops, seams are much less visible than with solid surface countertops. This is because the seams in quartz countertops are filled with a clear, epoxy resin. The epoxy resin creates a seamless appearance and makes the seams almost invisible.

One downside of quartz countertops is that they can be more expensive than solid surface countertops. However, many people feel that the increased cost is worth it for the improved seam visibility.

Durability.

When it comes to durability, quartz countertops are far superior to solid surface countertops. Quartz is one of the hardest minerals on Earth, and it’s this hardness that gives quartz its incredible strength.

Solid surface countertops, on the other hand, are made from a mixture of acrylic and polyester resins. While these materials are strong, they’re not as strong as quartz.

Repairs And Replacements.

When it comes to repairing and replacing countertops, both quartz and solid surface have their pros and cons. Quartz is generally more durable and easier to repair, while solid surface is more susceptible to damage and may require replacement more often.

If your quartz countertop is damaged, you can usually have it repaired fairly easily. Cracks and chips can be filled in and sanded down, and scratches can often be buffed out. Depending on the severity of the damage, you may be able to repair it yourself or you may need to hire a professional.

Maintenance.

It’s one of the most important factors to consider when choosing a countertop material. So, how do quartz and solid surface countertops compare in this department?

Quartz countertops are practically maintenance-free. You can clean them with soap and water or any household cleaner, and they’re resistant to stains and scratches.

Solid surface countertops are also easy to clean, but they’re more susceptible to scratches and stains. To avoid damage, use a cutting board and hot pad when preparing food on a solid surface countertop.

Overall, quartz countertops are the clear winner when it comes to maintenance. But if you’re looking for a material that’s more budget-friendly, solid surface countertops are a good option.

Heat Resistance.

When it comes to heat resistance, quartz countertops are the clear winner. Quartz is able to withstand temperatures up to 1200 degrees Fahrenheit, while solid surface countertops can only handle temperatures up to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. So, if you’re looking for a countertop that can stand up to the heat of your stove or oven, quartz is the way to go.

Quartz is also less likely to suffer from heat damage than solid surface countertops. If you accidentally leave a hot pan on your quartz countertop, it’s not likely to cause any permanent damage. However, if you do the same thing on a solid surface countertop, you could end up with a nasty burn mark.

So, if you’re looking for a countertop that can withstand high temperatures and won’t be damaged by accidental heat exposure, quartz is the way to go.

Scratch resistance.

Quartz countertops are made with a process that fuses together natural quartz crystals with resins and pigments to create a non-porous, hard surface. This makes quartz countertops more resistant to scratches than solid surface countertops.

Solid surface countertops are made of a mixture of acrylic or polyester resins and fillers. While the material is durable, it is not as scratch resistant as quartz.

Sealing Needs.

When it comes to countertops, one of the most important things to consider is sealing. Sealing helps protect your countertop from stains and damage, and it also makes it easier to clean. Quartz countertops are non-porous, so they don’t need to be sealed. Solid surface countertops are porous, so they need to be sealed on a regular basis.

The frequency of sealing depends on the type of solid surface countertop you have. For example, Butcher block countertops need to be sealed more often than granite or marble countertops. If you’re not sure how often to seal your solid surface countertop, ask a professional.

Home Resale Value.

Quartz countertops have been increasing in popularity over the past few years. They are more durable than granite and require less maintenance. Quartz countertops also have a higher resale value than solid surface countertops.

If you are considering selling your home in the future, quartz countertops may be a better investment than solid surface countertops.

Fabrication.

The next thing to consider is the fabrication process. Quartz countertops are made using a process called Bretonstone. This involves mixing quartz aggregate with pigments and resin, and then shaping it under vacuum and pressure. Solid surface countertops, on the other hand, are made by casting acrylic or polyester resins into molds.

DIY Installation.

If you’re handy around the house and have some experience with home improvement projects, you may be considering installing your own countertops. Here we’ll compare quartz countertops vs. solid surface countertops in terms of installation difficulty so you can make the best decision for your project.

Quartz countertops are made from a man-made material that is composed of 90% ground quartz and other minerals, binders, and pigments. This mixture is poured into molds of the desired countertop shape and then cured under heat and pressure. Solid surface countertops are made from a solid piece of acrylic or polyester material. The material is then molded or carved into the desired countertop shape.

Quartz countertops are a little more difficult to install than solid surface countertops. The main reason for this is that quartz countertops are much heavier than solid surface countertops. This means that you’ll need to take extra care when handling and installing quartz countertops to avoid damage. In addition, quartz countertops require special tools for cutting and shaping.

Solid surface countertops are generally easier to install than quartz countertops. The material is lighter and can be cut with standard woodworking tools. Solid surface countertops also don’t require any special sealing or finishing, making the installation process simpler.

Environmental Issues.

Quartz countertops are made from natural stone, so they are a more sustainable option than solid surface countertops, which are made from petroleum products.

Quartz countertops vs. solid surface countertops: Final Verdict.

The debate between quartz countertops and solid surface countertops has been going on for years, with no clear winner in sight. However, we’re here to give you the final verdict: quartz countertops are the better option!

Quartz countertops are made from one of the hardest minerals on earth, making them incredibly durable and scratch-resistant. They’re also non-porous, so they won’t absorb spills or stains.

Solid surface countertops are made from a mix of acrylic and polyester, making them less durable than quartz. They’re also more susceptible to staining and scratching.

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FAQs

Are solid surface countertops more expensive than quartz?

The answer to this question depends on a few factors, including the brand and quality of the materials. Generally speaking, solid surface countertops are going to be more expensive than quartz countertops. However, there are some lower-priced solid surface options on the market that may be comparable in price to quartz. When making your decision, it’s important to factor in the quality of the materials as well as the installation costs.

Installation costs can vary significantly depending on the type of countertop you choose. Solid surface countertops generally require professional installation, which can add to the overall cost. Quartz countertops, on the other hand, are typically easier to install and may not require professional help.

Which is better Corian or quartz?

There’s no easy answer to this question since it depends on a number of factors. Corian is generally less expensive than quartz, but quartz is more durable.

If you’re looking for a countertop that will last a long time without showing wear and tear, quartz may be the better choice. However, if you’re on a budget, Corian may be a better option. Ultimately, the decision comes down to your personal preferences and needs.