Cockroaches in Indiana: 6 Types, Identification, and Removal

If you’re a homeowner or business owner in Indiana, it’s important to be aware of the types of cockroaches that are indigenous to the area. Cockroaches are not only unsightly, but they can also be carriers of disease.

In this blog post, we will discuss the different types of cockroaches that are found in Indiana, as well as how to identify them and remove them from your premises.

Do Indiana cockroaches fly?

No one really knows for sure. Some people say that they’ve seen them fly, while others swear that cockroaches in Indiana can’t fly. So, what’s the truth?

Well, it turns out that cockroaches actually can fly – but not all of them. In fact, most species of cockroach are incapable of flight. However, there are a few species that can fly for short distances.

So, do Indiana cockroaches fly? It’s possible – but it’s more likely that they don’t.

How big are cockroaches in Indiana?

The answer may surprise you! Cockroaches in Indiana can grow up to three inches long. That’s longer than a standard ruler! And they’re not just big in size – these critters can also live for up to two years.

Bugs that look like cockroaches in Indiana

These insects are commonly referred to as waterbugs or palmetto bugs and are classified under the beetle family. They can be a nuisance, especially when they enter your home in search of food or water.

While they may resemble cockroaches, these pests do not pose the same health risks as true cockroaches. However, they can still cause allergic reactions in some people and should be removed from your home as soon as possible.

Related: 12 Bugs That Look Like Cockroaches (But Aren’t)

Cockroaches in other states:

Types of cockroaches in Indiana

Cockroaches are one of the most common pests in Indiana. There are several different types of cockroaches that can be found in homes and businesses throughout the state.

The most common type of cockroach in Indiana is the German cockroach. Other types of cockroaches that can be found in Indiana include the American, Oriental, Brown-banded, and Smokeybrown cockroaches.

1. German cockroach

German cockroaches are one of the most common cockroach species in Indiana. They are small, dark brown, and have two stripes on their backs. German cockroaches are often found in homes and businesses.

Habitat: German cockroaches are found in homes and businesses. They often live in kitchens and bathrooms, where they can find food and water.

Diet: German cockroaches eat food that is left out, like scraps of food on the floor or counter. They also drink water from sinks and toilets.

Reproduction: German cockroaches reproduce quickly. A female can have up to 50 offspring in her lifetime.

Eggs: German cockroach eggs are small and brown. They are found in clusters of 30 to 50 eggs.

Nymphs: Nymphs are baby cockroaches. German cockroach nymphs are dark brown and have two stripes on their backs.

Adults: Adult German cockroaches are small, dark brown, and have two stripes on their backs. They grow to be about ½ inch long.

Removal: German cockroaches can be difficult to remove from your home or business. Cockroach traps and baits can be used to control them. Pest control professionals can also help get rid of German cockroaches.

Prevention: The best way to prevent German cockroaches is to keep your home or business clean. Vacuum regularly and clean up any food scraps. Seal cracks and crevices where cockroaches can enter.

2. American cockroach

American cockroaches are the largest cockroaches found in Indiana. They are brown with a yellowish figure eight pattern on their back. These roaches are fast runners and strong flyers. They are often found near food sources and in damp areas such as basements and sewers.

Habitat: American cockroaches live in a variety of habitats including homes, restaurants, grocery stores, food processing facilities, and sewer systems.

Food: American cockroaches are omnivorous and will eat a wide variety of foods including decaying organic matter, garbage, pet food, and even other insects.

Reproduction: Female American cockroaches can lay up to 50 eggs at a time. The eggs are deposited in an egg case (called an ootheca) which is then carried by the female until it is ready to hatch.

Eggs: Cockroach eggs are small, oval, and dark brown in color. They are typically found in clutches of 30-50 eggs.

Hatching: Cockroaches hatch from their eggs in approximately two weeks. The newly hatched cockroaches, called nymphs, look like miniature versions of the adults and undergo a series of molts as they grow.

Life Cycle: The typical lifespan of an American cockroach is about one year. However, under ideal conditions, they can live for up to three years.

Adults: American cockroaches typically grow to be about one and a half inches long. They are brown with a yellowish figure eight pattern on their back. These roaches are fast runners and strong flyers.

Predators: American cockroaches have a variety of predators including birds, rats, mice, and other insects.

Control: If you have American cockroaches in your home, the best course of action is to contact a professional pest control operator. Cockroaches can be difficult to control and eliminate on your own.

Prevention: The best way to prevent cockroaches in your home is to keep your house clean and free of food sources that they may be attracted to. Vacuum regularly, store food in airtight containers, and seal any cracks or openings that cockroaches could use to enter your home.

3. Oriental cockroach

Oriental cockroaches are dark brown to black in color and about one inch long. They are shiny and have a smooth body. These cockroaches are often found near water sources, such as drains, sewers, and damp basements. Oriental cockroaches can be a nuisance because they produce an unpleasant odor.

Habitat:

Oriental cockroaches are often found near water sources, such as drains, sewers, and damp basements.

Diet:

Oriental cockroaches are scavengers and will eat just about anything.

Reproduction:

Female oriental cockroaches can lay up to eight egg capsules in their lifetime. Each capsule contains about 16 eggs.

Eggs:

The eggs are dark brown and about one-eighth of an inch long.

Nymphs:

Nymphs (immature cockroaches) are small, wingless, and dark brown to black in color. They have a body that is slightly longer than one-half of an inch.

Adults:

Adult oriental cockroaches are dark brown to black in color and about one inch long. They are shiny and have a smooth body.

Predators:

Oriental cockroaches have many predators, including birds, rats, mice, and other carnivorous insects.

Control:

Oriental cockroaches can be controlled with baits, traps, and insecticides. For more information, contact a professional pest control company.

Prevention:

Oriental cockroaches can be prevented by sealing cracks and crevices around the home, removing food sources, and keeping the area clean and free of clutter.

4. Brown-banded cockroach

Brown-banded cockroaches are one of the most common cockroaches in Indiana. These pests are small, brown, and have two light-colored bands across their abdomens. Brown-banded cockroaches are often found in homes and businesses, where they feed on food scraps and other organic matter.

Habitat: Brown-banded cockroaches are found throughout the United States. These pests prefer warm, dry environments, and are often found in homes and businesses.

Diet: Brown-banded cockroaches are omnivorous, meaning they will feed on both plant and animal material. These pests typically eat food scraps and other organic matter.

Reproduction: Brown-banded cockroaches reproduce rapidly, with each female producing up to 50 eggs at a time. These eggs are deposited in small egg cases, which are often found in dark, warm places.

Eggs: Brown-banded cockroach eggs are small and brown, and are deposited in small egg cases. These egg cases are often found in dark, warm places.

Nymphs: Brown-banded cockroach nymphs are small, brown, and have two light-colored bands across their abdomens. Nymphs typically molt six to seven times before reaching adulthood.

Adults: Brown-banded cockroach adults are small, brown, and have two light-colored bands across their abdomens. Adults typically live for about one year.

Predators: Brown-banded cockroaches are preyed upon by a variety of animals, including birds, rodents, and insects.

Removal: Brown-banded cockroaches can be difficult to control and remove. If you suspect you have an infestation, it is best to contact a professional pest control company for assistance.

Prevention: The best way to prevent brown-banded cockroaches is to keep your home or business clean and free of clutter. Make sure to seal any cracks or crevices in your walls and floors, and vacuum regularly.

5. Smokeybrown cockroaches

Smokeybrown cockroaches are one of the most common cockroaches in Indiana. They are brown with a light brown or yellowish band across their back. Smokeybrown cockroaches are about half an inch to an inch long.

They can be found in homes, businesses, and other structures. Smokeybrown cockroaches are attracted to food and water sources. They will eat just about anything, but prefer sweets. Smokeybrown cockroaches are not known to carry diseases, but can contaminate food with their waste.

Habitat:

Smokeybrown cockroaches live in a variety of habitats. They are commonly found in homes, businesses, and other structures.

Diet:

Smokeybrown cockroaches will eat just about anything, but prefer sweets.

Reproduction:

Female Smokeybrown cockroaches can lay up to 20 egg capsules in their lifetime. Each egg capsule contains about 30-40 eggs. Eggs hatch in about 28 days. Nymphs ( juvenile cockroaches) go through six molts before reaching adulthood. Adults can live up to one year.

Predators:

Smokeybrown cockroaches have many predators, including birds, bats, snakes, lizards, frogs, and spiders.

Control:

The best way to control Smokeybrown cockroaches is to remove their food and water sources. Cockroach traps and baits can also be used. If you have a problem with Smokeybrown cockroaches, contact a pest management professional.

6. Pennsylvania Wood Cockroach

Pennsylvania Wood Cockroaches, Periplaneta americana, are large cockroaches that are often mistaken for Palmetto Bugs. They are dark brown to black in color and can grow up to two inches long.

Pennsylvania Wood Cockroaches are not native to Indiana but can be found in some homes and businesses. These cockroaches typically live outdoors but may come indoors to mate or search for food. Pennsylvania Wood Cockroaches are not considered a health risk but can be a nuisance.

Habitat:

Pennsylvania Wood Cockroaches are not native to Indiana but can be found in some homes and businesses. These cockroaches typically live outdoors but may come indoors to mate or search for food.

Diet:

Pennsylvania Wood Cockroaches are omnivorous and will eat a variety of food sources. They are often attracted to garbage, pet food, and other organic matter.

Reproduction:

Pennsylvania Wood Cockroaches reproduce sexually and each female can lay up to 30 eggs at a time. The eggs are deposited in an egg case called an ootheca which is then carried by the female until they hatch.

Hatching:

It takes about 50 days for Pennsylvania Wood Cockroach eggs to hatch. Once they hatch, the nymphs will go through several molts before reaching adulthood.

Adults:

Adult Pennsylvania Wood Cockroaches can live up to one year. They are strong flyers and are attracted to light.

Signs of Infestation:

The most common sign of a Pennsylvania Wood Cockroach infestation is the presence of adults or egg cases in the home. Cockroaches are often seen in kitchens and bathrooms but can be found anywhere in the home.

Control and Prevention:

The best way to control Pennsylvania Wood Cockroaches is to prevent them from entering the home in the first place. Seal cracks and openings around the exterior of the home, including doors and windows.

Remove potential food sources like garbage and pet food from around the home. If you do have an infestation, contact a professional pest control company for assistance. Cockroaches can be difficult to control and eliminate on your own.

How to get rid of cockroaches in Indiana

There are a few things that you can do to get rid of cockroaches in your home. One of the best ways is to keep your house clean and free of food scraps and crumbs.

Cockroaches are attracted to food, so if you don’t have any food for them, they’ll be less likely to stick around. You can also try using traps or baits to kill them. If you have a serious infestation, you may need to call an exterminator.

Related: How to Get Rid of Cockroaches and Keep Them Away

Conclusion

In conclusion, there are three main types of cockroaches in Indiana: German, American, and Oriental. Each type has its own unique characteristics that can help you identify it. If you think you have a cockroach problem, the best thing to do is call a pest control professional who can help you remove them from your home.