5 Types of Cockroaches in Ohio: Identification and Removal Tips

Cockroaches are a common nuisance in Ohio. There are several types of cockroaches that can be found in the state, and they all have different habits and preferences.

In this blog post, we will discuss the most common types of cockroaches in Ohio, as well as how to identify them and remove them from your home or business. Let’s get started!

Are roaches common in Ohio?

According to the Ohio Department of Health, roaches are indeed common in Ohio. In fact, they are one of the most common insects that people deal with.

Roaches can be a nuisance because they can contaminate food and spread disease. They are also difficult to control once they get established in an area.

What do roaches in Ohio look like?

Roaches in Ohio are brown and about an inch long. They have six legs and two antennae. Roaches can fly, but they don’t usually fly unless they’re scared. When roaches are scared, they run away quickly.

How big are cockroaches in Ohio?

The size of cockroaches in Ohio can vary depending on the species. Some common cockroach species in Ohio include the German cockroach, which is about ½ an inch long, and the American cockroach, which is about one to two inches long.

However, some cockroaches can grow much larger, such as the Australian giant burrowing cockroach, which can grow up to four inches long.

Whether you have a small or large cockroach infestation in your home, it is always best to contact a professional pest control company for assistance.

Related: Cockroach Infestation- Signs, Health Impact, Treatment, and More…

Are there flying cockroaches in Ohio?

The internet seems to think so! A quick search of “flying cockroaches in Ohio” brings up a number of results from people who have allegedly seen them. But are they really cockroaches? Or are they something else entirely?

There are a few different insects that could be mistaken for flying cockroaches. One of them is the palmetto bug, which is a type of cockroach that is common in southern states. Palmetto bugs can grow to be quite large, and they are good flyers. They are also attracted to light, so they could easily be mistaken for cockroaches.

Another possibility is the waterbug. Waterbugs are a type of beetle that is often found near water. They can also fly, and they are attracted to light. Waterbugs are usually a bit smaller than cockroaches, but they could still be mistaken for them.

So, what’s the verdict? Are there flying cockroaches in Ohio? It’s hard to say for sure. But if you see something that looks like a cockroach flying around, it’s probably one of these other insects.

Related: 12 Bugs That Look Like Cockroaches (But Aren’t)

Are oriental cockroaches in Ohio?

The simple answer is yes, oriental cockroaches can be found in Ohio. These insects are most commonly found in urban areas and are often seen in sewers, drains, and damp basements.

Types of cockroaches in Ohio

There are five main types of cockroaches that you’ll find in Ohio: American, German, Brown-banded, Pennsylvania Wood, and Oriental. Each type has its own unique characteristics and behaviors that make them a nuisance in your home. Here’s a closer look at each type of cockroach so you can be better prepared to deal with them:

1. American cockroach

American cockroaches are one of the most common cockroaches in Ohio. American cockroaches can fly, and are often found in dark, damp places.

Habitat: American cockroaches are often found in dark, damp places.

Food: American cockroaches eat a variety of food, including garbage and other insects.

Danger: American cockroaches can spread disease, and their droppings can cause asthma.

Appearance: American cockroaches are large, reddish-brown, and have a yellow band on their head. They can grow up to three inches long.

Behavior: American cockroaches are nocturnal, and often fly when they are disturbed.

Reproduction: American cockroaches can lay up to 50 eggs at a time.

Eggs: American cockroach eggs are dark brown, and are about the size of a grain of rice.

Nymphs: American cockroach nymphs are small, wingless, and brown. They grow quickly, and can molt up to 13 times before they reach adulthood.

Adults: American cockroach adults are large, reddish-brown, and have a yellow band on their heads. They can grow up to three inches long.

Lifespan: American cockroaches can live for up to two years.

Predators: American cockroaches have a few predators, including birds, lizards, and rats.

Fun Fact: American cockroaches are sometimes called “waterbugs” because they often live near water.

Control: American cockroaches can be controlled with baits, traps, and insecticides.

Prevention: American cockroaches can be prevented with good hygiene and sanitation.

2. German cockroach

German cockroaches are the most common type of cockroach in Ohio. They are also the most difficult to control. German cockroaches are small, dark brown, and have two stripes on their backs. German cockroaches are very prolific breeders and can produce up to six generations per year.

German cockroaches are not only a nuisance, but they can also pose a health risk. German cockroaches are known to spread disease-causing bacteria like salmonella and E. coli. They can also trigger asthma attacks in people who are allergic to them.

Habitat: German cockroaches can be found in all types of buildings, but are especially fond of warm, humid places like kitchens and bathrooms.

Food: German cockroaches are omnivorous and will eat just about anything.

Behavior: German cockroaches are nocturnal and are often seen running around at night. They are also very good at hiding, which makes them difficult to control.

Reproduction: German cockroaches reproduce rapidly, with each female producing up to six egg capsules in her lifetime. Each capsule contains 30-48 eggs.

Eggs: German cockroach eggs are small and brown, and are typically found in cracks and crevices.

Nymphs: Nymphs are small, dark-colored, and have two stripes on their backs. They are about the same size as an adult German cockroach when they hatch.

Adults: Adults are small, dark-colored, and have two stripes on their backs. They range in size from 12 to 16 mm (0.47 to 0.63 in).

Predators: German cockroaches are preyed upon by lizards, birds, and rodents.

Control: German cockroaches are difficult to control because they reproduce so quickly. The best way to control German cockroaches is to prevent them from getting into your home in the first place.

Keep your home clean and free of food debris, and seal up any cracks and crevices where they might be able to enter. If you do have German cockroaches, you can try using traps or baits. You can also contact a pest control professional for help.

3. Brown-banded cockroach

Brown-banded cockroaches are one of the most common cockroaches in Ohio. They are small, brown, and have two dark stripes running across their backs. Brown-banded cockroaches are not known to carry diseases, but they can trigger allergies in some people.

Habitat: Brown-banded cockroaches are found in a variety of habitats, including homes, apartments, hotels, and office buildings.

Diet: Brown-banded cockroaches feed on a variety of food sources, including crumbs, pet food, insects, and even other cockroaches.

Reproduction: Brown-banded cockroaches reproduce quickly, with a female able to produce up to 50 eggs at a time.

Eggs: Brown-banded cockroach eggs are small, oval, and brown in color. They are typically found in cracks and crevices near food sources.

Nymphs: Brown-banded cockroach nymphs are small, brown, and have two dark stripes running across their backs. They molt several times as they grow, eventually reaching adulthood.

Adults: Adult brown-banded cockroaches are small, brown, and have two dark stripes running across their backs. They typically measure between ½ and ⅝ of an inch in length.

Predators: Brown-banded cockroaches have a few natural predators, including spiders, ants, and centipedes. However, their main predator is humans.

Control: Brown-banded cockroaches are difficult to control and often require the help of a professional pest control company.

Prevention: The best way to prevent brown-banded cockroaches is to keep your home clean and free of food sources. Vacuum regularly, seal up cracks and crevices, and eliminate potential hiding spots.

4. Oriental cockroach

Oriental cockroaches are one of the most common types of cockroaches in Ohio. They are dark brown or black in color and can grow up to an inch long. These cockroaches are often found in damp, dark places like basements or sewer systems. Oriental cockroaches are known to carry diseases and can be a nuisance to homes and businesses.

Habitat:

Oriental cockroaches are often found in damp, dark places like basements or sewer systems. They can also be found in gardens and other outdoor areas.

Diet:

Oriental cockroaches feed on decaying organic matter, such as leaves and dead insects. They may also eat human food if it is available.

Reproduction:

Female Oriental cockroaches can lay up to 20 eggs at a time. The eggs are deposited in a dark, moist place, such as in rotting wood or under leaves. The eggs hatch into nymphs, which resemble adults but are smaller and lack fully developed wings. Nymphs mature into adults in about two to three months.

Eggs:

Female Oriental cockroaches can lay up to 20 eggs at a time. The eggs are deposited in a dark, moist place, such as in rotting wood or under leaves.

Nymphs:

Nymphs resemble adults but are smaller and lack fully developed wings. Nymphs mature into adults in about two to three months.

Adults:

Adult Oriental cockroaches are dark brown or black in color and can grow up to an inch long. They have wings, but cannot fly.

Predators:

Birds, reptiles, and small mammals are among the predators of Oriental cockroaches.

Control:

Oriental cockroaches can be controlled with a variety of methods, including traps, baits, and insecticides.

If you think you may have an infestation of Oriental cockroaches, contact a pest control professional for assistance. Cockroach control is best left to the professionals, as these pests can be difficult to eliminate.

Prevention:

To prevent Oriental cockroaches from entering your home or business, seal any cracks or openings in the foundation and around doors and windows. Be sure to keep food and water sources clean and free of debris. Regular vacuuming can also help to remove cockroaches and their eggs from your home.

5. Pennsylvania Wood Cockroach

Pennsylvania Wood Cockroaches are one of the most common types of cockroaches in Ohio. They are dark brown or black, and about 13-16 mm long. Pennsylvania Wood Cockroaches are found in wooded areas, and are often attracted to homes by the lights at night.

These cockroaches can fly, and are often seen in basements, garages, and other dark places. Pennsylvania Wood Cockroaches are not considered to be a health hazard, but they can be a nuisance.

Habitat:

Pennsylvania Wood Cockroaches are found in wooded areas, and are often attracted to homes by the lights at night. They can be found in basements, garages, and other dark places.

Diet:

Pennsylvania Wood Cockroaches feed on a variety of food sources, including wood, leaves, and other plant material. They also eat insects, and are sometimes seen in homes feeding on crumbs or other food that has been left out.

Reproduction:

The female Pennsylvania Wood Cockroach produces an egg case, which contains about 30-40 eggs. The egg case is dark brown or black, and is about 13 mm long. The egg case is found in cracks and crevices in the home, and can often be seen in basements, garages, and other dark places.

Nymphs:

The nymphs of the Pennsylvania Wood Cockroach are dark brown or black, and about 13-16 mm long. They look like adults, but are smaller. Nymphs can be found in the same places as adults.

Adults:

Adult Pennsylvania Wood Cockroaches are dark brown or black, and about 13-16 mm long. They are found in wooded areas, and are often attracted to homes by the lights at night.

Predators:

The predators of Pennsylvania Wood Cockroaches include birds, bats, and centipedes.

Control:

If you have Pennsylvania Wood Cockroaches in your home, you can try to control them with insecticidal sprays or baits. You can also seal cracks and crevices in your home to prevent them from entering.

Prevention:

To prevent Pennsylvania Wood Cockroaches from entering your home, seal all cracks and crevices around the outside of the home. Keep lights off at night, and remove any potential food sources, such as garbage. If you have Pennsylvania Wood Cockroaches in your home, contact a pest control professional to get rid of them.

Cockroaches in other states:

Conclusion

So there you have it, the three most common types of cockroaches in Ohio. While they may all be pests, each one has its own unique characteristics. armed with this knowledge, you should be able to identify which type of cockroach is infesting your home and take the appropriate steps to get rid of them.

If you have any questions or need help getting rid of cockroaches, be sure to contact a pest control professional. They will be able to help you identify the type of cockroach and provide you with the best course of treatment. Thanks for reading!