34 Parts of a Furnace (Gas, Electric) and What They Do

If you’re like most homeowners, you don’t think too much about your furnace until it stops working. Then, suddenly, you become very interested in the parts of a furnace and what they do!

In this blog post, we will discuss the different parts of a furnace and what each one does. We’ll also provide some tips on how to keep your furnace running smoothly all winter long!

Related: 30+ Different Types Of Furnaces With Pictures (Buying Guide)

Parts of a furnace

1. Return Register

This is the part of your furnace where air enters. The return register typically has a cold air filter attached to it.

2. Heating Element

The heating element is what actually produces the heat that will warm your home.

3. Thermostat

The thermostat is what tells the furnace when to turn on and off.

4. Vents

The vents are what allow the warm air to escape from your furnace and into your living space.

5. Return Duct

The return duct is the part of your furnace that returns air to the system. This is where the cold air filter is typically located.

6. Supply Ducts

The supply ducts are the part of your furnace that deliver warm air to your living space.

7. Damper

The damper is a flap that opens and closes to control the amount of air that flows through the furnace.

8. Damper Handle

The damper handle is the lever that opens and closes the damper.

9. Supply Register

The supply register is the part of your furnace that delivers warm air to your living space. It typically has a hot air filter attached to it.

10. Limit Switch

The limit switch is a safety device that turns the furnace off if the temperature gets too high.

11. Fuse

The fuse protects the electrical components of your furnace from damage.

12. Supply Plenum

The supply plenum is the part of your furnace that delivers warm air to your living space.

13. Thermal Cut-Off

The thermal cut-off is a safety device that turns off the furnace if it gets too hot.

14. Heat Exchanger

The heat exchanger is the part of your furnace that actually produces the heat.

15. Combustion Chamber

The combustion chamber is the part of your furnace where the fuel is burned.

16. Burners

The burners are what actually produce the heat that will warm your home.

17. Flue Pipe

The flue pipe is the part of your furnace that vents the combustion gases to the outside of your home.

18. Burner Cover

The burner cover is the part of your furnace that covers the burners.

19. Pilot Light

The pilot light is the small flame that ignites the fuel in your furnace.

Related: Furnace Pilot Light Won’t Light: How to Get It Burning Again

20. Main Burner Tube

The main burner tube is the part of your furnace that carries the fuel to the burners.

21. Thermocouple

The thermocouple is a safety device that monitors the temperature of the furnace.

22. Hot surface ignitor

The hot surface ignitor is what ignites the fuel in your furnace.

23. Flame Sensor

The flame sensor is a safety device that monitors the flame in your furnace.

24. Blower

The blower is responsible for circulating the warm air throughout your home.

Related: Why Is My Furnace Blowing Cold Air? Here’s What To Do

25. Blower Chamer

The blower chamber is the part of your furnace that houses the blower.

26. Furnace Filter

The furnace filter helps to keep the air in your home clean and free of allergens and other particles.

27. Blower Motor

The blower motor powers the fan that circulates the air through your furnace.

28. Blower Wheel

The blower wheel is the part of your furnace that moves air from the furnace to the vents.

29. Gas valve

The gas valve is the part of your furnace that delivers fuel to the burners.

30. Igniter

The igniter is what starts the flame in your furnace.

31. Pressure Switch

The pressure switch is a safety device that monitors the pressure in your furnace.

32. Draft Inducer Motor

The draft inducer motor powers the fan that circulates the air through your furnace.

33. Limit Switch

The limit switch is a safety device that turns the furnace off if the temperature gets too high.

34. Gas manifold

The gas manifold is the part of your furnace that delivers fuel to the burners.

Tips on how to keep your furnace running smoothly all winter long

As the colder months approach, it’s important to make sure that your furnace is in good working condition. By following a few simple tips, you can help keep your furnace running smoothly all winter long.

One of the most important things you can do is to have your furnace serviced by a professional before the start of the heating season. A professional will be able to inspect your furnace and make any necessary repairs or adjustments.

In addition, you should also regularly clean the filters in your furnace. Dirty filters can reduce the efficiency of your furnace and cause it to run more loudly.

You should also keep an eye on the pilot light. If the flame is yellow or orange, it could be a sign that the pilot light needs to be adjusted.

Finally, make sure that there is enough airflow around your furnace. If there isn’t, it can cause the furnace to overheat.

By following these tips, you can help keep your furnace running smoothly all winter long.

How Do the Parts of a Furnace System Work?

The blower is responsible for pushing heated air through the furnace and into your home. The heat exchanger is where the heating process happens. It heats up the air that passes through it, which then goes out to your home.

The burner ignites fuel and starts the heating process. The thermostat tells the furnace when to turn on and off, depending on the temperature you set. The limit switch is a safety feature that turns off the furnace if it gets too hot.

The combustion chamber is where the fuel and air mix together to create heat. The pilot light ignites the fuel in the furnace so that it can start heating up your home.

Each of these parts plays an important role in the overall function of your furnace. Without one of these parts, your furnace would not be able to heat your home effectively.

If you are having problems with your furnace, it is important to have a professional take a look at it to determine which part is not working properly. By doing this, you can ensure that your furnace is working properly and that you are getting the most out of your heating system.

How many parts are in a gas furnace?

Parts of a gas furnace include the:

-heat exchanger

-blower motor

-ignitor

-flame sensor

-vent pipe

-furnace cabinet.

The heat exchanger transfers heat from the burning gas to the air flowing through it. The blower motor forces air through the heat exchanger, and the ignitor lights the gas. The flame sensor makes sure there is a flame, and the vent pipe removes fumes from the furnace. The furnace cabinet protects all of the parts.

Related: 7 Worst Furnace Brands To Avoid and 5 Most Reliable Brands

What is the inside of a furnace made of?

The inside of a furnace is made up of several parts, all working together to create heat. The most important part of the furnace is the firebox. This is where the fuel is burned to create heat.

The firebox is surrounded by a layer of insulation, which helps to keep the heat in and make the furnace more efficient. The hot air from the firebox is then circulated through the home by a blower fan.

The furnace also has a heat exchanger. This is a metal coil that gets very hot when the furnace is running. The hot air from the firebox passes through the heat exchanger and warms up the air being circulated through the home.

What is the most important part of a furnace?

There are many different parts to a furnace, but the most important part is the heat exchanger. The heat exchanger is responsible for transferring heat from the combustion chamber to the air that is being circulated through the home.

If the heat exchanger becomes damaged, it can cause a number of problems, including carbon monoxide leaks and fires.

What does the inside of my furnace look like?

Most people have never seen the inside of their furnace, and that’s perfectly normal. There’s no need to go poking around in there unless you’re experiencing problems with your heating system.

However, if you are having issues with your furnace, it can be helpful to know what the different parts look like. That way, when you’re talking to a heating technician, you’ll be able to describe the problem more accurately.

The inside of a furnace is actually pretty simple. There are three main parts: the burners, the heat exchanger, and the blower. The burners are where the fuel (usually natural gas or propane) is burned to create heat. The heat exchanger is where the heat from the burners is transferred to the air, and the blower blows that hot air through your home.

There are also a few other minor parts, like the igniter and the flame sensor. The igniter is what starts the combustion process, and the flame sensor monitors whether or not there is a flame present. If either of these components fails, the furnace will not work.

So now you know what the inside of your furnace looks like. If you’re having problems with it, be sure to give your heating technician a call so they can help you get it fixed. And remember, if you’re ever uncomfortable working on your furnace yourself, always call a professional.

What is the top of a furnace called?

The top of a furnace is called the “crown.” The crown is the highest point on the furnace, and it’s where the hot gases escape. The crown is also where you’ll find the burner, which is the part of the furnace that actually produces the heat.

What are the parts of an oil furnace?

The oil furnace has three main parts: the burner, the heat exchanger, and the blower. The burner is what burns the fuel, and it’s located in the front of the furnace. The heat exchanger is where the heat from the burning fuel is transferred to the air, and it’s located in the back of the furnace. The blower is what pushes the air through the furnace and into your home.

Oil furnaces are also equipped with a few other parts, like a filter, a thermostat, and a flue. The filter helps to keep the air clean, and it should be replaced regularly. The thermostat controls the furnace’s temperature, and the flue helps to vent the fumes from the burning fuel outside.

Conclusion

As you can see, there are many different parts to a furnace and each one has a specific purpose. By understanding the function of each component, you can be sure that your furnace is running safely and efficiently. If you have any questions, feel free to leave them in the comments below. Thanks for reading!