Sedum Varieties: 57 Best Types of Sedum (Growing and Care Guide)

Sedum is a genus of succulent plants that are popular for their drought tolerance and showy blooms. There are many different types of sedum, each with its own unique characteristics. In this blog post, we will discuss the best sedum varieties for your garden. We will talk about their care requirements, flowering habits, and how to use them in your landscape design. So if you’re looking for some beautiful and easy-to-care-for plants, keep reading!

Related: 118+ Different Types Of Succulents With Names, Photos For Indoors and Outdoors (Succulent Identification)

In this article:

What are sedums?

Sedums are a type of succulent plant that is native to North America. They are known for their fleshy leaves and stems, which store water. Sedums grow in a variety of habitats, including deserts, mountains, and grasslands.

There are over 600 species of sedum plants, and they come in a wide range of colors, including green, red, yellow, and purple. Sedums are popular plants for gardens and landscaping because they are easy to care for and require little water.

Fun facts about sedum.

Did you know that there are over 600 species of sedum? That’s a lot of sedum! Sedum is native to North America, Europe, and Asia. Sedum is a succulent plant, which means it stores water in its leaves.

This makes sedum a great plant for dry climates or for people who forget to water their plants! Sedum is also a great plant for gardens because it doesn’t require a lot of care. Just give it some sun and well-drained soil and it will be happy.

Sedum is sometimes called stonecrop because it often grows in rocky areas. Sedum is also known as donkey tail because of its long, tail-like leaves. Sedum flowers are very popular with bees and other pollinators. In fact, sedum is one of the most important plants for honeybees!

Types of Sedum.

Sedum is a large genus of flowering plants in the family Crassulaceae, native to Europe, Asia and North America.

Tall border varieties (Hylotelephium or Sedum telephium).

These varieties can grow up to three feet tall and produce an abundance of beautiful blooms. They are perfect for adding height and interest to your garden beds and borders.

Trailing varieties (Sedum morganianum).

A plant that’s native to Mexico, it has long, thin leaves that are a deep green color. The flowers are small and yellow, and they bloom in the summer. Sedum morganianum is a succulent, so it doesn’t need much water. It’s a good plant for beginners because it’s easy to care for.

Sedum Varieties

The majority of the species are sun-loving and can tolerate drought well. Here are some common sedums that you might find in your garden.

1. Angelina Sedum (Sedum rupestre ‘Angelina’).

A beautiful, low-growing succulent with yellow-green leaves that take on a reddish hue in full sun. Perfect for adding a splash of color to any garden or landscape!

This Sedum is perfect for hot, dry locations and is very drought tolerant. It can handle full sun to partial shade and does best in well-drained soil.

Angelina Sedum is a great choice for rock gardens, edging, groundcover, or as a succulent accent in mixed planting beds. It can even be used in containers!

3. Autumn Joy Sedum (Hylotelephium ‘Herbstfreude’).

Autumn Joy Sedum is a herbaceous perennial succulent of the Crassulaceae family. It is native to central and eastern Europe. The plant grows to 30–50 cm (12–20 in) tall with a spread of 45–60 cm (18–24 in).

The leaves are opposite, oblanceolate, green to grey-green, up to 12 cm (47 in) long and up to 25 mm (0.98 in) wide, with a rounded to truncate apex. The flowers are borne in terminal corymbs, pale pink in bud, opening to deep pink, and fading to light pink or coppery-red; each flower head is up to 15–20 mm (0.59–0.79 in) diameter, with around 60-70 petals.

Flowering occurs in late summer to fall (August to October in the Northern Hemisphere). The fruit is a dry, woody capsule containing numerous small seeds.

4. Callisia Repens ‘Pink Lady’ (Turtle Vine).

This beautiful plant is native to Mexico and South America. The pink flowers are very pretty and they attract hummingbirds. The plant is easy to grow in a pot or in the ground. It does not like cold weather, so it is best to grow it in a warm climate.

The ‘Pink Lady’ variety of Callisia Repens is a very popular plant. It is often used as an ornamental plant in gardens. The plant is also known to have medicinal properties. It can be used to treat skin conditions and wounds.

5. Callisia Repens Sedum.

This plant is a succulent that originates from Mexico. The Callisia Repens Sedum has long, thin, green leaves that are arranged in a spiral pattern on the stem. The flowers of this plant are white and they bloom in the summertime. This plant is easy to care for and it is drought tolerant.

6. Cherry Tart Sedum.

Cherry Tart Sedum is a great plant for rock gardens, succulent gardens, or even as a ground cover. It is native to Mexico and has beautiful pink flowers that bloom in the summer. The leaves are green and fleshy with a slightly tart flavor.

Sedum is a drought tolerant plant and can tolerate full sun to partial shade. Cherry Tart Sedum is a great plant for those who are new to gardening or those who want a low maintenance plant.

7. Crassula pubescens subsp. radicans (Red carpet sedum)

Red carpet sedum is a beautiful, fast-growing succulent that forms dense mats of color. The leaves are small and oval-shaped with a reddish hue. The flowers are white or pink and bloom in the summer.

Red carpet sedum is easy to care for and can be grown in most climates. It does best in full sun but can tolerate some shade. It is drought tolerant and can be grown in poor soils.

To propagate, simply take stem cuttings in the spring or summer and plant them in well-draining soil. They will root quickly and form new plants. You can also propagation by division in the spring. Simply divide the mat into smaller sections and replant.

8. Dragon Blood Sedum.

Dragon Blood Sedum is a beautiful and easy to grow succulent that is perfect for adding a splash of color to your landscape. This Sedum is native to Mexico and has stunning deep red leaves that are accented by small white flowers in the spring and summer.

Dragon Blood Sedum is drought tolerant and can handle full sun or partial shade, making it a versatile plant for your garden.

This plant is also deer resistant, so you don’t have to worry about your landscape being munched on by these pesky critters. Dragon Blood Sedum is a great addition to any succulent collection and is sure to add interest and color to your landscape.

9. Graptosedum ‘California Sunset’.

Graptosedum ‘California Sunset’ is a beautiful and easy to grow succulent that adds color and interest to any succulent collection. The leaves of Graptosedum ‘California Sunset’ are a beautiful rosy pink, with tips that turn peach in color as they mature.

10. Hylotelephium sieboldii (Japanese Stonecrop).

A beautiful succulent that is native to Japan. It has large, fleshy leaves that are a deep green in color with purple margins. The flowers are small and white, blooming in summer. This plant is perfect for growing in containers or as a groundcover.

Hylotelephium sieboldii is a drought tolerant plant, once established. It prefers full sun to partial shade and well-drained soil. Japanese Stonecrop is not frost hardy and should be protected from cold weather.

11. Pink Mongolian Stonecrop (Hylotelephium ewersii)

Pink Mongolian Stonecrop (Hylotelephium ewersii) is a beautiful, drought-tolerant succulent that originates from Mongolia. It grows in long, trailing stems with fleshy, pink leaves. The flowers are small and white, blooming in summertime.

This plant is perfect for growing in containers or as groundcover in dry, sunny areas. It is low-maintenance and relatively pest- and disease-free. Pink Mongolian Stonecrop is a great choice for gardeners looking for an easy-to-care-for plant with eye-catching foliage.

12. Sedum Adolphii (Golden Sedum or Sedum Firestorm)

Sedum Adolphii is a fast-growing, succulent plant that is native to Mexico. It has thick, fleshy leaves that are a deep green color with yellow margins.

The flowers are small and yellow, and they bloom in the summertime. Sedum Adolphii is an easy plant to care for and it is drought tolerant. It can be propagated by stem cuttings or by leaves.

Sedum Adolphii is a great plant for beginners, because it is so easy to care for. It doesn’t need much water and can tolerate some neglect.

13. Sedum album (White Sedum).

Sedum album is a species of flowering plant in the family Crassulaceae, native to central and southern Europe.

It is an evergreen perennial growing to 20 cm (12 in) tall by 30 cm (24 in) wide, with opposite, simple oblong leaves up to 15 cm (12 in) long.

The flowers are white or pale pink, borne in summer on panicles up to 15 cm (12 in) long.

The plant is tolerant of a wide range of conditions, including full sun and dry soil. It is also resistant to deer and rabbits.

14. Sedum album ‘Murale’.

Sedum album ‘Murale’ is a succulent plant that is native to Europe. The leaves are linear and fleshy, and the flowers are white or pale pink.

Sedum album ‘Murale’ is an easy plant to grow, and it is drought tolerant. This plant can be found in gardens, or it can be grown in containers.

Sedum album ‘Murale’ is a beautiful plant, and it is perfect for those who are looking for a low-maintenance succulent.

15. Sedum ‘Angelina’.

Sedum ‘Angelina’ is a succulent plant that is native to Mexico. The leaves of the plant are green and have a yellow margin. The flowers of the plant are yellow and bloom in the summer.

Sedum ‘Angelina’ is a drought tolerant plant and can grow in full sun or partial shade. The plant can be propagated by seed, stem cuttings, or division.

Sedum ‘Angelina’ is a low maintenance plant that is perfect for those who do not have a lot of time to care for their plants. The plant does not require a lot of water and can be left to dry out between watering.

The plant can also tolerate some neglect and still remain healthy. Sedum ‘Angelina’ is an ideal plant for those who are new to succulents or for those who do not have a lot of experience caring for plants.

16. Sedum ‘Blue Spruce’.

Sedum ‘Blue Spruce’ is a beautiful, blue-gray succulent that resembles a miniature spruce tree. It is native to Mexico and grows best in full sun to partial shade.

This sedum is perfect for planting in rock gardens, as ground cover, or in containers. It is drought tolerant and does not require much water once established.

17. Sedum cauticola ‘Lidakense’.

Sedum cauticola ‘Lidakense’ is a striking succulent that is perfect for adding visual interest to any garden. The plant has fleshy, blue-green leaves that are arranged in a rosette shape.

The leaves are edged with red and have a powdery coating that helps to protect the plant from sunburn.

Sedum cauticola ‘Lidakense’ is a drought tolerant plant that is native to the island of Lidak, Japan. The plant can be grown in full sun or partial shade and prefers well-drained soil.

Sedum cauticola ‘Lidakense’ is an easy to care for plant that makes a great addition to any succulent collection.

18. Sedum Dasyphyllum Major (Corsican Stonecrop or Blue Tears Sedum).

Sedum Dasyphyllum Major is a low-growing, mat-forming succulent with blue-green leaves. The stems are branched and the leaves are arranged in opposite pairs. The flowers are yellow, borne on stems up to 30 cm tall.

Sedum Dasyphyllum Major is native to Corsica and Sardinia, where it grows on rocky slopes and in crevices. It is also found in the wild in France, Italy, Spain and Morocco.

This sedum is a great choice for groundcover in rock gardens or for growing in walls. It is drought tolerant and can handle full sun to partial shade.

19. Sedum Dasyphyllum Minor.

Sedum Dasyphyllum Minor is a succulent plant that is native to Morocco. The leaves are blue-green in color and the plant produces yellow flowers.

This plant is drought tolerant and can grow in full sun or partial shade. Sedum Dasyphyllum Minor is an easy to care for plant that makes a great addition to any succulent collection.

20. Sedum divergens (Cascade Stonecrop).

Sedum divergens is a species of sedum native to the western United States and northwestern Mexico, where it can be found in rocky habitats, such as cliffs and talus slopes.

It is a member of the stonecrop family (Crassulaceae), which includes many other well-known succulent plants, such as Sedum rubrotinctum (Jelly Bean Plant) and Sedum niveum (Snow Stonecrop).

Sedum divergens is a low-growing plant, reaching only about 15 cm (six inches) in height. The leaves are thick and fleshy, up to three cm (one inch) long, and have a blue-green coloration. The flowers are yellow, and appear in summer.

Sedum divergens is a popular plant for use in rock gardens and xeriscaping (landscaping with drought-tolerant plants), due to its low water requirements and tolerance for poor soils. It can be propagated easily from stem cuttings, and is not susceptible to pests or diseases.

21. Sedum Ewersii (Hylotelephium ewersii).

Sedum Ewersii (Hylotelephium ewersii) is a succulent plant in the genus Sedum.

The leaves are oblong and up to 12 cm (0.47 in) long. The flowers are yellow, with up to 30 petals.

It is native to China and Mongolia.

In its natural habitat, it grows on sunny, rocky slopes at an altitude of 1000-3000 m (3300-9800 ft).

The plant was first described by German botanist Gustav Heynhold in 1883.

It was named after German botanist and explorer Karl Ewers (1837-1915), who collected the type specimen in Mongolia in 1880.

Sedum Ewersii is a popular succulent plant, and is widely cultivated as an ornamental plant.

It is tolerant of poor soil and dry conditions, and can be grown in full sun or partial shade.

The plant can be propagated by stem cuttings or leaf cuttings.

22. Sedum ewersii var. homophyllum ‘Rose Carpet’ (Rose Carpet Sedum).

Rose carpet sedum is a low-growing, mat-forming succulent that is perfect for rock gardens, borders, and ground covers. The leaves are oblong to elliptical, fleshy, and bright green with red margins. The flowers are pinkish-white and appear in summer. Rose carpet sedum is native to Mexico.

This sedum is a great choice for those who want a low-maintenance plant that is easy to care for. It is drought-tolerant and does not require much water. The plant can be propagated by cuttings or division.

23. Sedum ‘Frosty Morn’.

Sedum ‘Frosty Morn’ is a beautiful, low-growing succulent with blue-grey leaves. The name ‘Frosty Morn’ comes from the fact that the leaves often have a frosty appearance.

Sedum ‘Frosty Morn’ is native to Mexico and can be found in the wild growing on rocky hillsides. It is a hardy plant and can tolerate periods of drought.

Sedum ‘Frosty Morn’ is a great plant for use in rock gardens, succulent gardens, or as a groundcover. It is also an excellent plant for growing in containers.

24. Sedum Fuzzy Wuzzy.

Sedum Fuzzy Wuzzy is a type of succulent that is native to Mexico. It is a member of the Crassulaceae family and is closely related to Sedum dendroideum.

The plant grows to be about 12 inches tall and has leaves that are up to an inch long.

The leaves are covered in a white fuzz, which is why the plant gets its name. The flowers of the Sedum Fuzzy Wuzzy are yellow and bloom in the summertime.

25. Sedum Golden Moss (Sedum de oro).

Sedum Golden Moss is a beautiful, low-growing succulent with yellow leaves that turn red in the sun. It is native to Mexico and can be found growing on rocks and cliffs.

Sedum Golden Moss is a great plant for rock gardens or as an accent plant in landscape beds. It is drought tolerant and does not require much maintenance.

Sedum Golden Moss can be propagated by stem cuttings or by division of the plant. It is a fast grower and can quickly fill in an area. Sedum Golden Moss is also known as Sedum de oro, Stonecrop, and Goldmoss sedum.

26. Sedum grisebachii.

This species is native to the Canary Islands, and is a member of the Crassulaceae family. It is an evergreen succulent with a rosette growth habit, and can reach up to 30 cm in height.

The leaves are blue-grey in colour, and the flowers are yellow. Sedum grisebachii is a popular plant for use in rock gardens and succulent gardens.

This species is named after German botanist, Karl Wilhelm von Grisebach.

Sedum grisebachii is a beautiful evergreen succulent that makes a great addition to any garden. This native of the Canary Islands is a member of the Crassulaceae family.

It typically grows in a rosette shape and can reach up to 30 cm in height, although some specimens may only grow to half that size. The blue-grey leaves are one of the most striking features of this plant, and the yellow flowers are also very pretty.

27. Sedum hispanicum (Blue Carpet or Spanish Stonecrop).

Sedum hispanicum is a low-growing, evergreen succulent that forms a dense mat of blue-green leaves. The leaves are fleshy and slightly curved, with a sharp point at the tip.

They grow up to 0.75 inches (19 mm) long and 0.25 inches (0.64 cm) wide. The flowers are small and star-shaped, with five petals.

They are borne in clusters at the tips of the stems and open from late spring to early summer. The fruits are tiny, dry capsules that contain seeds.

Sedum hispanicum is native to Spain and Portugal. It grows in rocky, sandy soils and tolerates drought well. It is often used as a groundcover in gardens, and can also be grown in containers.

28. Sedum kamtschaticum.

Sedum kamtschaticum, also known as Russian stonecrop, is a succulent plant native to Siberia. The plant has fleshy, spoon-shaped leaves and produces small yellow flowers. Sedum kamtschaticum is hardy and drought tolerant, making it an ideal plant for gardens in dry climates.

Sedum kamtschaticum is a member of the Sedum genus, which includes over 400 species of succulent plants. Sedums are characterized by their fleshy leaves and stems, which store water in dry conditions. Many sedums are native to arid regions of the world, such as Mexico and Africa.

29. Sedum Lime Twister.

This Sedum is a succulent that is native to Europe. It has many benefits, such as being drought tolerant and having the ability to thrive in poor soil conditions.

The Sedum Lime Twister can reach up to 12 inches in height and produces yellow flowers. This plant is perfect for those who are looking for a low-maintenance option.

30. Sedum Lime Zinger.

Sedum Lime Zinger is a great plant for adding color and texture to your garden. The leaves are variegated with shades of green, yellow, and white, and the flowers are a beautiful pink. This plant is easy to care for and is drought tolerant.

31. Sedum Little Gem (Cremnosedum ‘Little Gem’).

Sedum Little Gem is a small, mounding succulent that is perfect for adding texture and interest to your succulent gardens and container plantings.

The plump, green leaves are arranged in a rosette pattern and the stems branch out from the center of the plant.

The tips of the leaves turn red in full sun, adding another layer of color to this already beautiful plant. Sedum Little Gem is not only drought tolerant, but also does well in full sun or partial shade.

32. Sedum Little Missy.

Sedum Little Missy is a great plant for rock gardens, borders, and edging. It is heat tolerant and drought resistant. The flowers are pink and white and bloom in summer. Sedum Little Missy is a low-growing plant that only reaches about six inches tall.

Sedum Little Missy is an easy plant to care for. It does not need much water and can tolerate some shade. It is a good plant for beginning gardeners.

33. Sedum makinoi ‘Ogon’.

Sedum makinoi ‘Ogon’ is a succulent plant that is native to Japan. The leaves of this plant are a beautiful golden yellow color. This plant does well in full sun to partial shade.

Sedum makinoi ‘Ogon’ is an easy plant to care for and is drought tolerant. This plant makes a great addition to any succulent garden.

Sedum makinoi ‘Ogon’ can be propagated by stem cuttings. To propagate by stem cuttings, take a cutting from the main plant and allow it to callous over for a few days. Once the cutting has calloused, it can be placed in well-draining soil.

34. Sedum morganianum (Burro’s Tail or Donkey’s Tail).

Sedum morganianum is a succulent plant native to Mexico. The plant is characterized by its long, thin leaves that resemble the tail of a donkey or burro. Sedum morganianum is a popular houseplant and is relatively easy to care for.

Some tips for caring for Sedum morganianum:

-The plant does best in bright, indirect light.

-Water the plant when the soil is dry to the touch.

-Be careful not to overwater the plant, as this can cause root rot.

-Fertilize the plant once a month during the growing season.

-When repotting, use a well-draining potting mix.

35. Sedum morganianum ‘Burrito’.

Sedum morganianum ‘Burrito’ is a beautiful and unique plant that is perfect for adding interest to any garden. It is native to Mexico and has long, trailing stems that are covered in tiny, succulent leaves.

The leaves are a striking blue-green color and the plant produces small, yellow flowers in summer.

Sedum morganianum ‘Burrito’ is a drought-tolerant plant that prefers full sun. It is easy to care for and requires very little maintenance. This plant is perfect for those who want to add a little bit of color and interest to their garden without having to do much work.

36. Sedum Murale (Sedum album subsp. teretifolium ‘Murale’).

Sedum Murale is a succulent plant that is native to Europe. It is a member of the Crassulaceae family and is closely related to Sedum album. The leaves of Sedum Murale are green and fleshy with a rounded shape. The flowers are white or yellow and bloom in the summertime.

Sedum Murale is a popular plant for growing in gardens and as a houseplant. It is easy to care for and requires little water. Sedum Murale can be propagated from stem cuttings or by division of the root system.

37. Sedum ‘Ogon’.

Sedum ‘Ogon’ is a beautiful, low-growing succulent with distinctive yellow leaves. It is native to Japan and Korea, and is perfect for adding a splash of color to your indoor or outdoor succulent collection.

Sedum ‘Ogon’ is easy to care for, and can be propagated by stem cuttings or leaf cuttings.

38. Sedum pachyclados (White Diamond Stonecrop).

Sedum pachyclados is a beautiful, low-growing succulent with white flowers that blooms in early summer. The White Diamond Stonecrop is native to Turkey and Iran, and is a member of the Crassulaceae family.

This plant is perfect for rock gardens, container gardens, or as groundcover. The White Diamond Stonecrop is tolerant of poor soils and drought, and is deer resistant.

Sedum pachyclados is a beautiful, low-growing succulent with white flowers that blooms in early summer. The White Diamond Stonecrop is native to Turkey and Iran, and is a member of the Crassulaceae family.

39. Sedum Pachyphyllum (Green Jelly Bean Sedum or Sedum Pork and Beans).

This is a beautiful, low-growing succulent with blue-green leaves. It forms nice rosettes and can grow up to 12 inches (30 cm) wide. The flowers are yellow and appear in summer.

This sedum is native to Mexico and can be found in the mountainous regions of that country. It grows at high altitudes, up to 12,000 feet (3600 m). The plant is adapted to growing in rocky, sandy soils.

Sedum Pachyphyllum is a great plant for containers and gardens. It is drought tolerant and can tolerate some shade. The plant is not frost hardy and should be protected from cold weather.

40. Sedum reflexum ‘Blue Spruce’ (Blue Spruce Sedum).

Sedum reflexum ‘Blue Spruce’ is a evergreen groundcover sedum that gets about 12 inches (30 cm) tall and wide. It has needle-like leaves that are blue-green in color. The flowers are yellow and appear in spring and summer.

This plant is native to Europe and Asia. It prefers full sun but will tolerate some shade. It is drought tolerant once established.

Sedum reflexum ‘Blue Spruce’ is a good choice for rock gardens, edges, and groundcover. It is also deer resistant.

Sedum reflexum ‘Blue Spruce’ is an evergreen groundcover sedum that gets about 12 inches (30 cm) tall and wide.

41. Sedum rubrotinctum ‘Brown Bean’.

Sedum rubrotinctum ‘Brown Bean’ is a sedum that is native to Mexico. It is a succulent that can grow to be about four inches tall. The leaves are brown and have a red tint to them, hence the name ‘rubrotinctum’ which means ‘red-tinged’. The flowers of Sedum rubrotinctum ‘Brown Bean’ are yellow and bloom in the summer.

Sedum rubrotinctum ‘Brown Bean’ is a great plant for those who are new to gardening or who do not have a lot of time to dedicate to their plants. They are easy to care for and require very little water. Sedum rubrotinctum ‘Brown Bean’ is a drought tolerant plant and can even tolerate some light frost.

42. Sedum Rubrotinctum ‘Aurora’ (Aurora Jelly Bean Sedum).

Sedum Rubrotinctum ‘Aurora’ is a beautiful, low-maintenance succulent with vibrant jelly bean-shaped leaves. They are easy to care for and make a great addition to any indoor or outdoor space.

Sedum Rubrotinctum ‘Aurora’ is native to Mexico and can tolerate hot, dry climates. They prefer well-drained soil and full sun to partial shade.

Sedum Rubrotinctum ‘Aurora’ is a great plant for beginners and experienced gardeners alike. They are low-maintenance and easy to care for.

43. Sedum Sieboldii (October Daphne)

Sedum Sieboldii is a species of sedum native to Japan. It is named after German botanist Philipp Franz von Siebold. The plant was first described by Carl Peter Thunberg in 1784.

Sedum Sieboldii is a succulent perennial with leaves that are arranged in a rosette form. The leaves are fleshy and have a green to brownish-green color. The flowers are yellow and appear in summer.

44. Sedum Spathulifolium (Broadleaf Stonecrop).

Sedum Spathulifolium is a species of flowering plant in the family Crassulaceae, native to western North America.

The leaves are spoon-shaped to obovate, and the flowers are yellow.

It is a succulent perennial that grows in rock crevices or on scree slopes.

Sedum Spathulifolium is an excellent plant for use in xeriscaping and as a groundcover.

It is tolerant of poor soils, drought, and heat.

The plant has a spread of 12 inches (30 cm) and a height of four inches (102 cm).

45. Sedum Spathulifolium ‘Cape Blanco’.

Sedum Spathulifolium ‘Cape Blanco’ is a beautiful succulent with blue-green leaves. The leaves are shaped like spoons, which is how it got its nickname, “spoonleaf sedum.” It’s a fast grower and can reach up to 12 inches tall.

Sedum Spathulifolium ‘Cape Blanco’ is native to Mexico and thrives in hot, dry climates. It’s a great plant for succulent gardens and makes a beautiful groundcover.

When grown in full sun, the leaves take on a pinkish hue. Sedum Spathulifolium ‘Cape Blanco’ is an easy plant to care for and is low maintenance.

46. Sedum spurium ‘Fuldaglut’.

This cultivar of Sedum spurium was selected for its deep red leaves which hold their color throughout the growing season. The plant forms a dense mat of ground-covering foliage that is perfect for use in rock gardens, as an edging plant, or in containers.

‘Fuldaglut’ produces small pink flowers in summer that attract bees and butterflies. This sedum is a tough plant that is tolerant of poor soil, heat, and drought. It is evergreen in mild winter climates.

47. Sedum spurium ‘John Creech’.

Awarded the prestigious RHS Award of Garden Merit, ‘John Creech’ is a vigorous, low-growing sedum that forms a tight mat of fleshy, dark green leaves. The tiny pink flowers appear in summer, attracting bees and butterflies to the garden.

A perfect choice for rockeries, alpine gardens or as groundcover in sunny borders, this tough little plant is also ideal for planting between paving stones or gravel. It’s perfect for beginners and experienced gardeners alike!

Sedum spurium ‘John Creech’ is a versatile plant that will thrive in most soil types as long as it is well-drained. It prefers full sun but will tolerate some light shade. Water sparingly, allowing the soil to dry out between waterings. To keep your plant looking its best, trim back any faded leaves or flowers in mid to late summer.

48. Sedum spurium ‘Tricolor’ (Phedimus spurius ‘Tricolor’).

Sedum spurium ‘Tricolor’ is an attractive, low-growing sedum that is perfect for use in rock gardens, as groundcover, or in containers. It forms a dense mat of fleshy, succulent leaves that are green with creamy-white margins and tipped with pink.

In late spring to early summer, small clusters of white flowers appear on the stems. This sedum is drought-tolerant and does best in full sun to partial shade. It is hardy in zones

49. Sedum Stahlii (Coral Beads or Coral Bells).

Sedum Stahlii is a perennial plant that is native to Mexico. It is a member of the Crassulaceae family and is closely related to Sedum dendroideum.

The leaves are opposite, oblong-lanceolate, and succulent with red margins. The flowers are bell-shaped and pink or white in color. The fruits are small, spherical, and black.

Sedum Stahlii is a popular ornamental plant and is used in gardens, parks, and public spaces. It is easy to care for and requires little maintenance. The plant is tolerant of drought, heat, and cold. It can be propagated by seed or cuttings.

50. Sedum Stenopetalum.

Sedum Stenopetalum is a species of flowering plant in the family Crassulaceae, native to Turkey.

The leaves are opposite, oblanceolate to spatulate, green to glaucous-green, and typically measure up to 50 mm (0.20 in) long by 15 mm (0.59 in) wide.

The flowers are borne on inflorescences up to 60 mm (0.24 in) long, each flower with five petals that are white to pinkish-white in color.

Sedum stenopetalum is a popular choice for rock gardens and xeriscaping, due to its drought tolerance. It can be propagated by stem cuttings or seed.

Sedum stenopetalum is a member of the genus Sedum, which contains around 600 species of succulent plants. Most Sedums are native to the Northern Hemisphere, with a few species found in Africa, Australasia, and South America.

51. Sedum Sunsparkler Blue Elf.

This plant is a hybrid between Sedum rupestre and Sedum pachyphyllum. It has blue-green leaves that turn red in the fall and winter. The flowers are yellow and bloom in the summer. This plant is drought tolerant and does best in full sun to partial shade.

Sedum Sunsparkler Blue Elf is a great plant for rock gardens, border edges, and containers. It is also a good ground cover. This plant is deer resistant and can handle some foot traffic.

52. Sedum Suzie Q English (Suzie Q English Stonecrop).

Sedum Suzie Q English is a fast-growing succulent that is perfect for those who are new to growing succulents. The plant has thick, fleshy leaves that are blue-green in color and have a slightly wavy margin.

The flowers are white and appear in clusters on the end of the stems. Sedum Suzie Q English is native to Europe and Asia and is hardy in zones four through eight.

53. Sedum telephium ‘Purple Emperor’.

A strong, easy to grow plant that will thrive in most garden conditions. It has deep purple, almost black leaves and large pink flowers that appear in summer and autumn. A really stunning plant that is perfect for adding some drama to your garden.

54. Sedum Ternatum.

A rock garden classic, Sedum Ternatum is a low growing, mat-forming sedum that produces yellow flowers in summer. It’s perfect for covering large areas of ground and tolerates poor soil and drought conditions.

Sedum Ternatum is an excellent choice for groundcover in rock gardens, between pavers, or as an edging plant. It’s also a good candidate for container gardens and xeriscaping.

Sedum Ternatum is native to the southeastern United States. It grows in full sun to partial shade and prefers well-drained soil. This sedum is drought tolerant and does not require much fertilizer or water once it’s established.

Sedum Ternatum can be propagated by division or cuttings. It’s a low-maintenance plant that is deer and rabbit resistant.

55. Sedum tetractinum ‘Coral Reef’ (Coral Reef Sedum).

This is a ground-covering sedum that forms a spreading mat of tiny, fleshy leaves. The leaves are green with red margins and tips, and they turn reddish in winter. Coral Reef Sedum produces yellow flowers in summer. It is drought tolerant and does best in full sun.

Sedum tetractinum ‘Coral Reef’ is a great plant for rock gardens, troughs, or as a groundcover. It is also suitable for growing in containers.

56. Sedum ‘Tricolor’.

Sedum ‘Tricolor’ is a beautiful succulent with colorful leaves. The leaves are variegated with shades of green, pink, and yellow. Sedum ‘Tricolor’ is a great plant for adding color and interest to your succulent collection.

Sedum ‘Tricolor’ is native to Mexico and can be found growing in rocky areas. Sedum ‘Tricolor’ is a drought tolerant plant and can tolerate long periods of dryness. Sedum ‘Tricolor’ is a low maintenance plant that is easy to care for.

57. Sedum ‘Vera Jameson’.

Sedum ‘Vera Jameson’ is a hybrid sedum that was created by crossing Sedum spathulifolium and Sedum pachyphyllum.

The resulting plant has the best traits of both parents: it is heat and drought tolerant, as well as being able to tolerate partial shade. The leaves are a beautiful blue-green color, and the flowers are pink. It blooms in late summer to early fall.

Related:

Planting sedum

When to plant sedum?

The best time to plant sedum is in the spring, after the last frost. Sedum can also be planted in the fall, but it may not have enough time to establish before winter sets in. If you live in an area with mild winters, you can plant sedum any time of year.

Where to plant sedum?

This is a question I get asked a lot. And the answer is, well, it depends! Sedum can be planted in just about any sunny spot in your garden, from alpine troughs to rock gardens and gravel gardens. They’re also perfect for filling cracks in paving and walls.

Sedum like a well-drained soil, so if your garden is heavy or clay-based, mix in some grit or sand to improve drainage. They’re also drought tolerant once established, so don’t worry about watering them too much.

How to plant sedum.

When it comes to planting sedum, there are a few things to keep in mind. First, make sure you choose a spot that gets plenty of sunlight. Sedum needs at least six hours of direct sunlight each day in order to thrive. Secondly, well-drained soil is critical for sedum success. If your soil is heavy and clay-like, consider amending it with some sand before planting.

Once you’ve selected the perfect spot and prepared your soil, it’s time to plant! When planting sedum from a nursery pot, be sure to loosen the roots before placing it in the ground. This will help encourage new growth. Once your sedum is in the ground, water it well and give it a little time to adjust to its new home. With a little care, your sedum will soon be thriving!

How to care for sedum

Sun and shade needs.

Sedum needs full sun to partial shade. It grows best in well-drained soil, but will tolerate some drought. When planting, be sure to space the plants far enough apart so that they have room to grow. Sedum is a low-maintenance plant, so once it’s established, you won’t need to do much to care for it.

Watering needs.

Sedums are one of the most drought-tolerant plants around, which makes them perfect for those who don’t have a green thumb. However, they still need some water to thrive. The best way to water your sedum is to soak the ground around the plant thoroughly once a week. If you live in an area with high humidity, you may need to water more often.

If you notice that your sedum’s leaves are starting to turn brown or wilt, it’s a sign that the plant is not getting enough water. If this happens, increase the frequency of your watering until the leaves return to their normal color.

Temperature needs.

Sedum requires moderate to high temperatures. They will not tolerate freezing temperatures for long periods of time. If you live in an area with cold winters, it is best to grow sedum indoors or in a greenhouse.

Temperatures that are too hot can also be detrimental to sedum plants. Prolonged exposure to temperatures over 100 degrees Fahrenheit can cause the leaves to wilt and the plant to go into dormancy.

The ideal temperature range for sedum is between 60 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit. They will tolerate some fluctuations outside of this range, but it is best to keep them within this range if possible. If you are growing sedum indoors, make sure that the room is well-ventilated and the plant has plenty of light. Sedum can tolerate some shade, but it will not do as well in low-light conditions.

Soil Needs.

Sedum requires very little in the way of soil nutrients. In fact, it will often do better in poor soils than in rich ones. It is an ideal plant for areas that are dry or rocky. If you are planting sedum in a pot, use a well-drained potting mix. Sedum is not particular about soil pH and will do well in both acidic and alkaline soils.

Fertilizing Needs.

Sedums are not heavy feeders, so they don’t need a lot of fertilizer. In general, it’s best to err on the side of under-fertilizing, because too much fertilizer can burn the leaves. If you do decide to fertilize, use a balanced fertilizer (such as 20-20-20) at half the recommended strength. Fertilize in early spring and again in mid-summer.

Propagating sedum.

Sedum is a great plant to propagate because it is easy to do and it rooting hormone. I will show you how to take a cutting from Sedum and grow more plants.

You will need:

-a sharp knife or garden shears

-a small pot with drainage holes

-potting mix

-rooting hormone

-a clear plastic bag

First, you will need to take a cutting from Sedum. Cuttings should be taken from new growth that is still soft. Cut at a 45-degree angle just below a leaf node. Remove the lower leaves on the cutting so that you have about two inches of stem.

Dip the cut end of the stem into rooting hormone. This will help encourage root growth.

Fill the pot with potting mix and make a hole in the center. Insert the cutting into the hole and firm the potting mix around it. Water well.

To create a humid environment for your cutting, place it inside a clear plastic bag. Put the bag over the pot and secure it with a rubber band.

Make sure to keep the soil moist but not wet. Place the pot in a warm, sunny location.

After a few weeks, you should see new growth on your cutting. Once the plant has rooted, you can remove it from the bag and pot it up into a larger pot.

Transplanting sedum.

Sedum can be transplanted at any time of year, but fall is the best time to do it. The plant will go dormant over winter and won’t need as much water. When transplanting, make sure to replant at the same depth as the plant was originally growing.

If the plant is too deep, it may rot. If it’s too shallow, the plant may not have enough support and could topple over. When replanting, be sure to water well and keep the plant moist until it becomes established.

Repotting sedum.

Sedum are known for their easy care, and one of the easiest ways to care for them is to repot them every year or two. This gives them a chance to spread out and grow, and also allows you to refresh the potting mix.

Here’s how to repot sedum:

First, choose a pot that is only slightly larger than the current one. Sedum don’t need a lot of room to grow, so there’s no need to go up more than one pot size.

Next, add some fresh potting mix to the new pot. You can use a commercial succulent mix or make your own by mixing equal parts sand, peat moss, and perlite.

Then, gently remove the sedum from its current pot. Be careful not to damage the roots.

Place the sedum in the new pot and fill in around it with more potting mix. Water well and place in a bright spot.

Pests and Diseases.

There are a few common pests and diseases that can affect sedum plants. Aphids, spider mites, and whiteflies are all potential problems. These pests can cause stunted growth, leaf discoloration, and reduced flower production.

Luckily, there are a number of ways to control them. Insecticidal soaps, horticultural oils, and neem oil are all effective against these pests. Powdery mildew is a common disease that can affect sedum plants. This disease is characterized by a white, powdery growth on the leaves and stems.

It can cause stunted growth and reduced flower production. Luckily, there are a number of ways to control it. Fungicides, sulfur, and copper are all effective against powdery mildew. With a little care, sedum plants can be relatively pest and disease free.

Common problems with sedum.

Sedum is a popular succulent plant, known for its easy care and drought tolerance. However, sedum can sometimes experience problems, such as leaf spot and root rot. Here are some tips on how to deal with common sedum problems:

Leaf spot is a fungal disease that causes brown or black spots to form on the leaves. The best way to prevent leaf spot is to water your sedum plants at the base, rather than from above. If your plant is already infected, you can remove the affected leaves and dispose of them.

Root rot is another fungal disease that can affect sedum plants. Root rot often occurs when the plant is overwatered or the soil is too wet. To prevent root rot, make sure to plant your sedum in well-draining soil and water it only when the top inch of soil is dry. If your plant is already infected, you can try to save it by removing the affected roots and replanting in fresh, dry soil.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a quick guide to some of the most popular Sedum varieties. As you can see, there is a Sedum plant to suit almost any garden style or planting scheme. So why not add one (or two, or three!) to your own garden today?

Happy gardening!