33 Different Types of Holly Trees and Bushes for Your Yard (Leaves, Flowers, Berries)

Do you want to add some holiday cheer to your yard this year? If so, consider planting a holly tree! There are many different types of holly trees, and each one has its own unique characteristics.

In this blog post, we will discuss the 33 best types of holly trees for your yard. We will also provide information on how to care for these trees and when is the best time to plant them. So, read on to learn more!

In this article:

How do I identify a holly tree?

There are several ways to identify a holly tree. One way is to look for the presence of spines on the leaves. Another way is to look for the presence of red berries. Holly trees can also be identified by their small, white flowers. Finally, holly trees typically have a pyramidal or columnar shape. If you see a tree that has all of these characteristics, it is likely a holly tree.

Holly Leaves.

Holly is an evergreen shrub that can grow to a height of 15 feet. Its leaves are dark green and glossy, with sharp spines along the margins. The small, white flowers bloom in spring, followed by red berries in late summer or fall. Holly is native to Europe, Asia and North America.

The leaves of holly are used to make wreaths and garlands. They are also used as a Christmas decoration. The berries are poisonous to humans, but they are eaten by birds.

Holly Flowers.

Holly flowers are small and white, borne in clusters on holly trees and bushes. The flowers have five petals and are about half an inch in diameter. They are pollinated by bees and other insects.

The holly flower is the state flower of Alabama.

Holly flowers symbolize hope, purity, and chastity. In the language of flowers, they also represent defense and protection.

Holly flowers are often used in holiday decorations, such as wreaths and centerpieces. They can also be dried and used in potpourri. Holly flower water is sometimes used in perfumes.

Holly Berries.

Holly berries are red, round, and grow on holly trees. They are used to make holiday decorations, such as wreaths and garlands. Holly berries are also used in some traditional medicines.

The holly berry is a symbol of Christmas and the winter season. It is often used in Christmas decorations, such as wreaths and garlands. The holly berry is also a symbol of good luck.

Holly berries are poisonous to humans and should not be eaten. If you suspect that someone has eaten holly berries, call poison control immediately. Symptoms of holly berry poisoning include vomiting, diarrhea, and stomach pain. In severe cases, holly berry poisoning can lead to coma and death.

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Types Of Holly Trees

1. Altaclere Holly (Ilex x altaclerensis)

Altaclere Holly is a hybrid holly, developed in 1901 by Charles Maries at Altaclere Park in Hertfordshire, England. A cross between the English holly (Ilex aquifolium) and the Portuguese holly (Ilex perado), it was introduced to the United States in 1929.

The Altaclere holly is a large evergreen shrub or small tree, growing to 20 feet (610 cm) tall and wide. It has dark green, spiny leaves and produces small, white flowers in spring, followed by black berries in fall and winter.

The Altaclere holly is adaptable to a variety of soils and prefers full sun to partial shade. It is tolerant of salt and wind, making it a good choice for coastal gardens.

This hybrid holly is a fast grower and can be used as a specimen plant or hedge. It is deer resistant and has no serious pest or disease problems.

2. American Holly (Ilex opaca)

American Holly (Ilex opaca)) is a native evergreen tree that grows in the eastern United States. The American Holly is an important source of food and shelter for many birds and animals. The American Holly is also used as a Christmas tree.

The American Holly has dark green, spiny leaves and red berries. The berries are poisonous to humans but are eaten by many animals. The American Holly is a slow-growing tree but can live to be over 100 years old.

The American Holly is an important part of the ecosystem and provides many benefits to humans and animals.

3. Apollo Winterberry Holly Shrub (Ilex verticillata ‘Apollo’)

Apollo Winterberry Holly Shrub (Ilex verticillata ‘Apollo’ is) a great choice for anyone looking to add some winter interest to their garden.

The shrub is covered in small, white flowers in the springtime which give way to bright red berries in the fall and winter. This plant is also very easy to care for, requiring little pruning or maintenance.

4. Blue Holly (Ilex x meserveae)

Blue Holly (Ilex x meserveae)) is a hybrid holly, developed by crossing English holly (Ilex aquifolium) and Chinese holly (Ilex cornuta).

It is a large evergreen shrub or small tree that can reach a height of 15 feet. The leaves are dark green and glossy, with sharp spines along the margins. The flowers are white, and the berries are blue-black.

Blue holly is a popular landscaping plant, used as an accent plant or hedge. It is relatively easy to care for, and can tolerate a wide range of soil and light conditions. However, it does require regular watering and pruning to maintain its shape.

5. Burford Holly Shrub (Ilex cornuta ‘Burfordii’)

This is a fast-growing, broadleaf evergreen that typically matures to 15-20 feet tall and as wide. It is noted for its glossy, dark green leaves (to four inches long) which have prominent spines along their margins.

Tiny white flowers appear in spring, but they are generally inconspicuous. The flowers are followed by black berries which ripen in fall and often persist into winter.

‘Burfordii’ is a female cultivar that needs a male holly in order to produce the berries. It was introduced by A.W. Wilson Nursery (Birmingham, Alabama) in 1963.

The Burford holly shrub is an excellent choice for hedges, screens, and foundation plantings. It is also a good candidate for topiary. This shrub is relatively tolerant of urban pollution and salt spray. It prefers full sun to partial shade, but it will tolerate some light shade.

The Burford holly shrub is adaptable to a wide range of soils as long as the soil is well-drained. Once established, it is drought tolerant. This shrub requires little pruning other than to shape it or control its size.

6. Carolina Holly (Ilex ambigua)

Carolina Holly is a native holly that grows in the southeastern United States. It is an evergreen shrub or small tree that can reach a height of 15-20 feet.

The leaves are elliptical and have sharp spines on the margins. The flowers are white and borne in clusters. The fruit is a red berry that ripens in fall and is enjoyed by birds.

Carolina holly is a popular landscape plant because of its attractive foliage and berries. It can be used as a hedge, screen, or specimen plant. This holly prefers full sun to partial shade and moist, well-drained soils. It is tolerant of salt and clay soils.

7. Catberry (Ilex mucronata)

Catberry is a native North American shrub that is found in woods, swamps, and along streams from Maine to Minnesota, and south to Florida and Louisiana.

The catberry shrub can grow to be 15 feet tall and has small, elliptical leaves that are dark green on top and paler beneath. The flowers are white and borne in clusters, blooming from May to June. The fruit is a small, dark berry that ripens in August and September.

The catberry shrub is an important food source for many animals, including deer, rabbits, and birds. The berries are also eaten by people, and can be made into jams, jellies, or pies. Catberry shrubs can be propagated by seed, cuttings, or layering.

Catberry shrubs are a valuable addition to any landscape, providing food and shelter for wildlife and beautiful flowers in the springtime.

8. Chinese Holly (Ilex cornuta)

Chinese Holly is a species of holly native to China. It is an evergreen shrub or small tree growing to 15 m tall. The leaves are variable in shape, usually with three to five lobes, occasionally seven-lobed, and measure up to 12 cm long and wide.

The flowers are dioecious, white or greenish-white, and borne in axillary clusters. The fruit is a red drupe containing a single seed.

Chinese holly is cultivated as an ornamental plant in temperate regions of the world. It is often used as a hedge or shrub, and can be trimmed to form a compact mound or globe shape.

It is also used in topiary. It is tolerant of a wide range of soil conditions, but prefers well-drained, moist soils. It is also tolerant of urban pollution and salt spray. This holly can be propagated from seed, cuttings, or by grafting.

9. Common Winterberry (Ilex verticillata)

Common Winterberry is a deciduous holly that is native to eastern North America. The plant grows in wetland habitats and can reach a height of 15 feet (457 cm).

The leaves are alternate, simple, and elliptical with serrated margins. The flowers are small and white, growing in clusters. The fruit is red and berry-like, ripening in the fall and persisting into winter.

Common Winterberry (Ilex verticillata) is an important food source for many birds and animals. The berries are also used in making jams, jellies, and pies. Native Americans used the plant for medicinal purposes.

10. Dahoon Holly (Ilex cassine)

Dahoon Holly is a native evergreen holly of the southeastern United States. The glossy green leaves and red berries of this holly make it a popular plant for holiday decoration.

Dahoon holly grows in coastal areas from North Carolina to Florida and west to Louisiana. This holly prefers full sun to partial shade and well-drained soil. Dahoon holly can be propagated from seed or cuttings.

11. Dwarf Burford Holly Shrub (Ilex cornuta ‘Burfordii Nana’)

Dwarf Burford Holly Shrub is a slow-growing, evergreen shrub that is perfect for small gardens or as an accent plant. It has dark green, glossy leaves and produces small, white flowers in the spring. This shrub is deer resistant and can be used in mass plantings or as a hedge.

Size: grows to be about two to three feet tall and wide.

USDA Hardiness Zones: This shrub can be grown in USDA hardiness zones six through eight.

Care: Dwarf Burford Holly Shrub is easy to care for and is tolerant of a wide range of soil conditions. It does best in full sun to partial shade and needs regular watering during the growing season. This shrub is relatively low maintenance and can be pruned to shape as needed.

12. English Holly (Ilex aquifolium)

English Holly is a species of holly native to western and southern Europe, northwest Africa, and southwest Asia. It is an evergreen tree or shrub growing to 15–25 m tall with a trunk up to 60 cm diameter.

The leaves are variable in shape, usually with sharp spiny-toothed edges; they are dark green above and paler below, and typically measure around 70 mm long and 30–50 mm broad.

The flowers are inconspicuous yellowish-green, with four petals; they are pollinated by bees. The fruit is a bright red drupe 25–35 mm diameter containing four seeds; it is eaten by birds such as thrushes, which disperse the seeds in their droppings.

The English holly is dioecious, with male and female flowers on separate trees; both are required for fruit to be produced. The wood is white and hard, taking a high polish.

It has been used since the Middle Ages for carving into bowls, spoons, cups, and other utensils, as well as into furniture and other items. It is also a popular material for making walking sticks and canes. The English holly is the official state flower of Alabama.

13. Finetooth Holly (Ilex serrata)

Finetooth Holly is a native evergreen holly that is found in the southeastern United States. The name “Finetooth” refers to the small, sharp leaves of this holly.

This holly can grow to be 15 feet tall and has small white flowers that bloom in the spring. The berries of this holly are red and ripen in the fall.

Finetooth Holly is a great plant for landscaping because it is low maintenance and provides year-round interest. This holly can be used as a specimen plant or in mass plantings. Finetooth Holly is also deer resistant, making it a good choice for areas where deer are a problem.

14. Hawaiian Holly (Ilex anomala)

Hawaiian Holly is a shrub or small tree in the family Aquifoliaceae, endemic to Hawaii. It grows up to 15 feet (45 m) tall and has dark green, glossy leaves. The flowers are white and blooming occurs from April to June. The fruit is a red berry that ripens from August to October.

The Hawaiian holly is found in dry to mesic forest and Woodland habitats on all the main islands. It is often found in ‘ohi’a (Metrosideros polymorpha) forests.

The Hawaiian Holly is an important plant in Hawaiian culture. The leaves and berries are used in lei making. The wood is used to make kapa beaters, combs and other small objects.

The Hawaiian Holly is considered an endangered species due to habitat loss from urbanization, agriculture and ranching.

15. Hedgehog Holly (Ilex aquifolium ‘Ferox Argentea’)

Hedgehog Holly (Ilex aquifolium ‘Ferox Argentea’) is a shrub or small tree that is native to Europe. The plant has dark green leaves and produces white flowers in the spring. The fruit of the hedgehog holly is a red berry that is poisonous to humans.

The hedgehog holly was introduced to North America in the early 1800s. The plant was brought over as an ornamental plant and has since naturalized in some parts of the United States. The hedgehog holly is considered an invasive species in New York, Connecticut, and Rhode Island.

The hedgehog holly can grow up to 15 feet tall and prefers to grow in full sun or partial shade. The plant is tolerant of a wide range of soil types and is drought tolerant. The hedgehog holly can be propagated by seed, cuttings, or division.

The hedgehog holly is an evergreen plant that provides winter interest in the landscape. The plant can be used as a specimen plant, in hedges, or in foundation plantings.

16. Inkberry (Ilex glabra)

Inkberry is a native American holly that ranges from New England to Florida, and west to Texas. It is found in a variety of habitats including maritime forests, swamp margins, and upland hardwood forests.

Inkberry is a low-growing shrub that typically reaches a height of four to six feet. The leaves are dark green and glossy with a prickly texture. The small white flowers bloom in early summer and are followed by black fruits that ripen in late summer and early fall.

Inkberry is an excellent plant for wildlife gardens. The fruits are eaten by a variety of birds including thrushes, robins, waxwings, and catbirds.

The foliage provides cover for small animals and the dense growth habit can be used to control erosion on slope sites. Inkberry is also a good plant for foundation plantings, hedges, and massing in naturalistic landscape designs.

17. Japanese Holly (Ilex crenata)

Japanese Holly is an evergreen shrub that is native to Japan. It has dark green, glossy leaves and small, white flowers. Japanese Holly is a popular plant for hedges and topiary because of its dense growth habit.

Japanese Holly can be propagated from seed or cuttings. It prefers full sun to partial shade and moist, well-drained soil. Japanese Holly is tolerant of a wide range of soils, including clay.

18. Longstalked Holly (Ilex pedunculosa)

Longstalked Holly (Ilex pedunculosa) is a deciduous holly that grows in the eastern United States. The leaves are dark green and leathery, with spines on the margins. The flowers are white, borne in clusters of three to five. The fruit is a red berry, ripening in late summer or early fall.

Longstalked Holly is a larval host plant for the Henry’s Elfin butterfly (Callophrys henrici). The berries are eaten by several species of birds, including the American Robin (Turdus migratorius), Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum), and Eastern Bluebird (Sialia sialis).

19. Lusterleaf Holly (Ilex latifolia)

Lusterleaf Holly (Ilex latifolia) is a native evergreen holly of the southeastern United States. It can be found in woodlands, along streams and in swampy areas. The lusterleaf holly is a large shrub or small tree that can grow to 30 feet tall with an equal spread.

The leaves are dark green and glossy, with sharp spines on the margins. The flowers are small, white and borne in clusters.

The fruit is a red berry that ripens in fall and persists into winter. Lusterleaf holly is an excellent plant for hedges, screens or as a specimen plant. It is tolerant of sun or shade and adapts to a wide range of soil conditions.

20. Myrtle-Leaved Holly (Ilex myrtifolia)

Myrtle-Leaved Holly (Ilex myrtifolia) is a species of holly that is native to the southeastern United States, from North Carolina south to Florida. The tree grows to 15-20 feet tall and has dark green, glossy leaves that are shaped like myrtle leaves.

The flowers are white and bloom in spring, followed by berries that ripen in fall and winter. Myrtle-Leaved Holly is an evergreen tree that is tolerant of salt spray and drought, making it an ideal tree for coastal landscapes. Plant Myrtle-Leaved Holly in full sun to partial shade in well-drained soil.

21. Needlepoint Holly (Ilex cornuta ‘Needlepoint’)

This is a female holly, so it needs a male plant nearby to produce berries. It’s an evergreen with dark green, prickly leaves and red berries. The needles are quite long and sharp, hence the name “needlepoint.”

This holly grows best in full sun or partial shade and prefers well-drained soil. It’s a low-maintenance plant and is relatively disease and pest-free. If you’re looking for a holly that will produce berries, Needlepoint Holly is a great choice!

22. Nellie Stevens Holly (Ilex X ‘Nellie R. Stevens’)

If you are looking for a fast-growing, dense, evergreen hedge or screen, the Nellie Stevens holly is an ideal choice.

Growing up to three feet per year, this holly can reach a height of 20 feet in just ten years. The glossy green leaves and bright red berries of the Nellie Stevens holly make it a beautiful addition to any landscape.

This hardy holly is tolerant of a wide range of soils and prefers full sun to partial shade. It is also drought tolerant once established. Nellie Stevens holly can be pruned to shape as desired and makes an excellent foundation plant or specimen plant.

23. Oak Leaf™ Holly Tree (Ilex x ‘Conaf’ P.P.# 9487)

Oak Leaf™ Holly Tree is an evergreen holly that is noted for its excellent oak-like foliage, dense growth habit and shiny red berries. It typically matures to 12-15′ tall with a spread to as much as 15-20′ wide.

This tree features lustrous, dark green leaves (to nearly black in some sun exposures) with deeply spined margins. Each leaf is oblong to ovate and measures up to nearly five inches long. Fragrant, white flowers appear in late spring, but are mostly hidden by the foliage.

Flowers are followed by abundant shiny red berries (to 0.25″ diameter) which ripen in fall and often persist into winter.

Berries may be somewhat toxic if ingested in large quantities. Genus name comes from the Latin name Ilex for the holm or holly oak (Quercus ilex L.). Specific epithet means originating in Chile.

24. Possumhaw Holly (Ilex decidua)

Possumhaw Holly is a deciduous holly that is native to the southeastern United States. Possumhaw Hollies are found in woodlands, bottomland hardwood forests, and streambanks.

The possumhaw holly is a small tree or large shrub that typically grows to 15-20 feet tall. The leaves of the possumhaw holly are elliptical to oval in shape and are dark green with a glossy surface.

The leaves of the possumhaw holly turn yellow, orange, or red in the fall. The flowers of the possumhaw holly are small and greenish-white in color. The fruit of the possumhaw holly is a red berry that is eaten by birds and other wildlife.

The possumhaw holly is an important plant for wildlife. The berries of the possumhaw holly are an important food source for birds and other wildlife during the winter months. The Possumhaw Holly is also used as a nesting site by some bird species.

25. Robin™ Red Holly Tree (Ilex X ‘Conin’)

This is a new, very dwarf holly with deep red leaves. It matures at only 18 inches tall and 12 inches wide, making it perfect for use as a low hedge or foundation planting. Robin™ Red Holly Tree (Ilex X ‘Conin’) is also one of the most cold tolerant hollies, so it’s a good choice for northern gardens.

This tough little holly is perfect for small spaces, and its deep red leaves add a beautiful touch of color to the winter landscape.

26. Round Leaf Holly (Ilex rotunda)

Round Leaf Holly is a species of holly that is native to China. The leaves of this plant are round, and the berries are red. This plant is often used as an ornamental plant in gardens.

Ilex rotunda has many benefits. This plant can help reduce stress and anxiety. Additionally, Round Leaf Holly can help improve sleep quality. This plant is also known to boost the immune system.

27. Sky Pencil Holly Tree (Ilex crenata ‘Sky Pencil’)

Sky Pencil Holly Tree is a holly tree that is popular for its narrow, columnar form. It is a slow-growing tree that can reach up to 15 feet tall and only four feet wide at maturity.

Ilex crenata ‘Sky Pencil’ makes an excellent choice for privacy hedges, screens, or foundation plantings.

Sky Pencil Holly Tree is also deer resistant and has few insect or disease problems. Sky Pencil Holly Tree is a popular tree for both residential and commercial landscapes.

28. Small-Leaved Holly (Ilex canariensis)

Small-Leaved Holly is a species of holly native to the Canary Islands. The leaves are small, glossy, and dark green. The flowers are white and borne in clusters. The fruit is a red berry.

Small-Leaved Holly is an evergreen shrub or small tree growing to 15 m tall. It has smooth, glossy, dark green leaves, small (to 20mm long) and with a sharp spine at the tip. The flowers are white, borne in clusters of two to five together; they are followed by red berries.

29. Soft Touch Holly Shrub (Ilex crenata ‘Soft Touch’)

This is a dense, mounded shrub that typically matures to only about two feet tall but can spread much wider. It has dark green, fine-textured leaves and small, white flowers in late spring followed by black berries in fall.

‘Soft Touch’ is a selection that is noted for its more compact growth habit as well as its resistance to leaf spot. Best growth occurs in full sun but this shrub is tolerant of some light shade.

It prefers moist, well-drained soils but will tolerate a wide range of soil conditions including clay. This shrub is somewhat slow to establish but once it does, it is quite heat and drought tolerant.

30. Southern Gentleman Winterberry (Ilex verticillata ‘Southern Gentleman’)

Southern Gentleman Winterberry is a deciduous holly that is noted for its unusual male flowers, which have long, showy stamens. The female flowers are inconspicuous. This holly is dioecious, meaning that both male and female plants are needed for pollination and fruit production.

Winterberry fruits are an important food source for many birds, including robins, cedar waxwings, and bluebirds. The fruits are also attractive to squirrels and other small mammals.

This holly is native to the southeastern United States, where it grows in wetland habitats. Southern Gentleman Winterberry is a relatively slow-growing plant, but it can reach heights of 15 feet or more.

This holly can be grown in full sun or partial shade, and it prefers moist, well-drained soils. Southern Gentleman Winterberry is an excellent choice for a native plant garden or naturalized landscape. It can also be used as a specimen plant or in mass plantings.

31. Winterberry Holly (Ilex verticillata)

Winterberry Holly (Ilex verticillata)) is a deciduous holly native to eastern North America, from Newfoundland to Minnesota south to Florida and Louisiana. It typically occurs in wet woods, swamps, and bogs. The species is also widely cultivated as an ornamental plant for its winter berries.

The specific epithet verticillata refers to the arrangement of the leaves in whorls (verticils) of three to six, around the stems. The leaves are simple, alternate, and short-stalked; they are elliptical to oblong-elliptical or ovate, with finely serrated margins and measure 0.75–11⁄16 inches (19–29 mm) long and 0.67–13⁄16 inches (17–21 mm) wide.

The upper surface is dark green and lustrous, while the lower surface is paler with a dull finish; both surfaces are hairless. The petiole is about 0.12 inches (30 mm) in length, slightly longer in female plants. The leaf venation is pinnate, with five to seven pairs of primary veins.

The flowers are borne in axillary clusters of two to six; they are white or greenish-white, with four petals and four sepals that remain attached after blooming (i.e., they are persistent). Each flower is about 0.12 inches (30 mm) in diameter, with eight stamens of unequal length.

The flowers are unisexual, with male and female flowers borne on separate plants (i.e., they are dioecious). Male flowers have four stamens that are about 0.16 inches (41 mm) long, while female flowers have four shorter stamens and a pistil with two styles. The blooming period occurs from late April to early May.

The fruits are drupes that mature during September–October; they are about 0.16–0.20 inches (41–51 mm) in diameter and turn from green to red or orange-red at maturity. Each drupe contains two or three seeds.

The woody root system is fibrous and spreading, often forming large colonies via stolons. This plant typically occurs in small patches or large colonies that cover several acres of wetland habitat.

32. Yaupon Holly (Ilex vomitoria)

Yaupon Holly (Ilex vomitoria) is an evergreen shrub or small tree that is native to the southeastern United States. Yaupon Holly grows in a variety of habitats, from swamps to dry uplands, and can reach a height of 15 feet (although most are much smaller).

The leaves are dark green and glossy, with sharp spines on the margins. The small white flowers are borne in spring, followed by bright red berries. Yaupon Holly is an important host plant for many species of butterflies and moths.

The name “Yaupon” comes from the Native American Yamassee Tribe and means “to vomit.” This name was given to the plant because of its use in a ceremonial purge that was thought to cleanse the body and soul. The active ingredient in Yaupon Holly is caffeine, and it is the only known plant in North America that contains this stimulant.

33. Yerba Mate (Ilex paraguariensis)

Yerba Mate (Ilex paraguariensis) is a species of holly native to subtropical South America. The leaves and twigs are used to make a tea called mate. It is traditionally consumed in central and southern regions of Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, Bolivia, southern Brazil, and northern Chile.

Yerba Mate has a long history of use by the indigenous people of South America. The Guaraní tribe, in particular, has a legend about the origin of the plant.

According to the legend, a beautiful woman named Alehuén was betrothed to a cruel man. Fearing for her life, she ran away into the forest and was never seen again. Many years later, the people of her tribe found her living in a cave with a plant that she said had given her life. The plant was called yerba mate.

Today, yerba mate is consumed all over South America, particularly in Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, and Brazil. It is traditionally drunk from a gourd (cuia) with a metal straw ( bombilla). The mate is brewed with hot water, and the cuia is passed around from person to person.

How to care for Holly trees

Holly trees are beautiful and unique, and they make a great addition to any landscape. But like all trees, they need proper care to stay healthy and thrive. Here are some tips on how to care for your holly tree:

– Watering: Holly trees need deep watering about once a week during the growing season. Be sure to water slowly and deeply, so that the water penetrates the root zone.

– Fertilizing: Holly trees need a balanced fertilizer applied in early spring. Be sure to follow the manufacturer’s instructions on how much and how often to apply.

– Pruning: Holly trees can be pruned in late winter or early spring. Be sure to prune before new growth begins.

FAQs

Is a holly a tree or a bush?

This is a question that I get asked a lot, and it’s one that I’m not really sure how to answer. Both trees and bushes are woody plants, and holly falls somewhere in between the two. It can grow as either a tree or a bush, depending on the species.

So, what exactly is a holly? Well, it’s a member of the genus Ilex, which includes about 600 species of flowering plants. Most hollies are evergreen, meaning they keep their leaves year-round. They’re also dioecious, meaning that male and female flowers grow on separate plants.

Hollies are found all over the world, from the coldest regions of Antarctica to the hottest parts of Africa. In North America, the most common species is Ilex opaca, or American holly. This holly is an evergreen tree that can grow up to 40 feet tall.

Which holly trees grow the fastest?

This is a question that is often asked, and there are a few factors to consider when answering it. The type of holly tree, the growing conditions, and the age of the tree all play a role in how fast it will grow.

The American holly (Ilex opaca) is one of the fastest-growing holly trees, typically adding about 24 inches per year. However, it can vary depending on the growing conditions. In ideal conditions, this tree can grow up to 36 inches per year. The European holly (Ilex aquifolium) is another fast-growing holly tree, typically adding 18-24 inches per year.

The Japanese holly (Ilex crenata) is a slower-growing holly tree, typically adding 12-18 inches per year. However, it can grow up to 24 inches per year in ideal conditions.

Age also plays a role in how fast a holly tree will grow. Younger trees tend to grow faster than older trees. This is because they are putting more energy into growth and have not yet reached their full potential size.

What is the smallest holly tree?

We don’t really know for sure, but the smallest holly tree on record is the Dwarf Yaupon Holly. This little tree only grows to about six feet tall and four feet wide, making it one of the smallest trees in the world. The Dwarf Yaupon Holly is native to the southeastern United States and can be found in Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida.

What are holly trees good for?

Holly trees are not only beautiful, but they are also very versatile. There are many different uses for holly trees, from providing shade to making furniture. Here are some of the most popular uses for holly trees:

-Shade: Holly trees can provide much-needed shade in hot summer months. They can be planted near windows to block out the sun’s rays, or placed in a garden to provide relief from the heat.

-Furniture: Holly trees are often used to make furniture. The wood is strong and durable, making it ideal for chairs, tables, and other pieces of furniture.

-Decoration: Holly trees can be used to add a festive touch to your home. They can be decorated with lights and ornaments, or used as part of a holiday display.

-Gift giving: Holly trees are often given as gifts, especially during the Christmas season. They can be used to make wreaths and garlands, or simply given as a symbol of goodwill

Are hollies evergreens?

Yes, hollies are evergreen plants. This means that they keep their leaves all year round. Hollies are native to Europe, Asia and North America. They grow in woods and hedges, and can also be found in gardens. There are over 600 species of holly.

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Conclusion

So there you have it, the 11 best types of holly trees for your yard. With so many different options to choose from, you’re sure to find the perfect tree for your home. So what are you waiting for?

Get out there and plant yourself some holly! Your yard will thank you for it.