The 13 Best Types of Palm Trees to Plant in Arizona (Photos)

Looking to plant some palm trees in Arizona? You’re in luck! In this blog post, we will discuss the 13 best types of palm trees to plant in Arizona. From the majestic Royal Palm to the versatile Date Palm, there is a type of palm tree for everyone. So whether you are looking for a shady spot under which to relax or a beautiful addition to your garden, read on for our recommendations!

Types of Palm Trees In Arizona

1. Alexandra palm (Archontophoenix alexandrae).

The Alexandra palm is one of the most popular palms in Arizona. It’s a fast grower and can get up to 30 feet tall. The leaves are green and have a beautiful, glossy sheen to them.

The trunk is thick and has a light brown color with darker brown stripes running down it. The Alexandra palm is native to Australia, but it can grow in a variety of climates.

The Alexandra palm is a great choice for anyone looking to add some tropical flair to their landscape. It’s also a good choice for people who want a fast-growing palm.

2. Bismarck Palm (Bismarckia nobilis).

It’s native to the island of Madagascar, and it was introduced to Arizona in the early 1900s. The Bismarck Palm is a beautiful tree that can grow up to 60 feet tall, with a trunk that’s up to 24 inches in diameter.

The leaves are blue-green, and they can be up to 12 feet long. The flowers are white, and they bloom in the spring. The fruit is red, and it’s about the size of a grapefruit.

The Bismarck Palm is a popular tree in Arizona, because it can survive in our hot, dry climate. It’s also drought-tolerant, and it doesn’t need much water. If you’re looking for a palm tree that will thrive in Arizona, the Bismarck Palm is a good choice.

3. California fan palm (Washingtonia filifera).

They are native to the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, where they are found in the wild in canyons, washes, and along streams. In the 1800s, they were introduced into Florida and have since become naturalized there. They are also common in Arizona as well as other parts of the American Southwest and Mexico.

The California fan palm is a large evergreen tree growing to 20 m (66 ft) tall, with a stout trunk up to 80 cm (31 in) diameter covered in old leaf bases.

The leaves are palmate, each up to about 90 cm (35 in) long and with numerous narrow leaflets. The leaf stem is 0.75-15 cm (0.30-0.59 in) long, and ends in a sharp point.

The flowers are small, white or pale yellow, borne on clusters up to 20 cm (79 in) long that hang down from the leaf axils. The fruit is a black drupe up to 15 mm (0.59 in) diameter; it is poisonous to humans.

The California fan palm occurs in desert washes and canyons, at elevations from sea level to about 1500 m (4921 ft). It is a highly drought-tolerant tree; its deep root system enables it to access groundwater, even in dry periods.

4. Hybrid King Piru Palms (Syagrus romanzoffiana ‘piru’ x Butia Capitata ‘King’).

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The palms are beautiful, but they don’t look like the stereotypical palm that people think of when they imagine Arizona.

These trees are actually a cross between two different species of palms, the King Palm and the Piru Palm. The result is a palm that is hardy enough to withstand the harsh conditions of the desert while still maintaining its tropical appearance.

5. Hybrid Mexican Fan Palms (Washingtonia hybrid).

These are the palms that you see in almost every desert landscape in Arizona. They are a cross between two species of palms, Washingtonia filifera (desert fan palm) and Washingtonia robusta ( Mexican blue palm).

The hybrids were first bred in Southern California in the early 1900s and were introduced into Arizona soon after.

The hybrids are sterile and cannot produce seeds, so they must be propagated by rooting cuttings. They are fast-growing palms and can reach a height of 60 feet (18 m) in just a few years.

The leaves are blue-green in color and have a leathery texture. The leaf margins are finely serrated and the leaflets are arranged in a V-shape. The flowers are small and white, borne on long panicles that hang down from the leaf axils.

The fruit is a small, black drupe that is not edible.

The hybrids are tolerant of a wide range of soil conditions and can even grow in poor, sandy soils. They are also drought-tolerant and can withstand long periods without water.

The hybrids are used extensively in landscape plantings in Arizona and are also popular as houseplants.

6. Mediterranean Fan Palms (Chamaerops humilis).

The University of Arizona Cooperative Extension says that these palms are “the most cold hardy of the true palms.” They are also drought tolerant and can grow in a wide range of soils, as long as it is well-drained. With proper care, they can live for decades.

The fronds of the Mediterranean Fan Palm are large and numerous, and they have a silvery-green color. The palms can grow to be 20 feet tall, but they are usually shorter. They are frequently used as landscape plants in Arizona.

7. Mexican blue palm (Brahea armata).

The Mexican blue palm is a beautiful, blue-green palm that grows to about 50 feet. It is native to Mexico and Arizona. The Mexican blue palm is an excellent choice for landscaping in the southwestern United States because it is heat and drought tolerant.

This palm tree prefers full sun and well-drained soil. It is also cold hardy to about 20 degrees Fahrenheit. The Mexican blue palm is a slow grower, but it is worth the wait for this stunning palm tree.

8. Pindo Palms (Butia capitate).

The Pindo Palm is a species of palm that is native to South America. It is also known as the Jelly Palm or Wine Palm because of the edible fruit it produces.

The Pindo Palm is a hardy plant that can tolerate cold temperatures and has been known to survive in areas where the temperature gets as low as -15 degrees Fahrenheit.

The Pindo Palm is a popular landscaping plant in many parts of the United States, including Arizona.

The Pindo Palm is a slow-growing palm that can reach a height of 20 feet. It has a single trunk that is covered with green, blue-green, or silver-gray leaves. The leaves are long and narrow and can be up to 12 feet long.

The Pindo Palm produces yellow or orange flowers that bloom in the spring. The fruit of the Pindo Palm is a drupe that is about the size of a fig. It has a thick, edible flesh that surrounds a large seed. The fruit is sweet and has been used to make jams, jellies, and wine.

The Pindo Palm is a hardy plant that can tolerate cold temperatures and has been known to survive in areas where the temperature gets as low as -15 degrees Fahrenheit. The Pindo Palm is a popular landscaping plant in many parts of the United States, including Arizona.

9. Pineapple Palms (Phoenix canariensis).

The Canary Island Date Palm is a popular landscaping plant in the southwestern United States, especially in Arizona. The palm is native to the Canary Islands, and its scientific name comes from the island of Tenerife.

The Phoenix canariensis grows to be around 50 feet tall and has a lifespan of 100 years or more. This palm tree is easily recognizable by its blue-green leaves and yellow fruits.

The Canary Island Date Palm is a slow grower, but it can reach up to 20 feet in height in just 15 years. This palm is tolerant of drought and can survive in temperatures as low as 20 degrees Fahrenheit.

The Phoenix canariensis is an evergreen tree, meaning it will keep its leaves year-round. The palm tree is also known for its ability to filter pollutants from the air, making it a great plant for cities.

10. Piru Queen Palms (Syagrus romanzoffiana ‘piru’).

Piru Queen Palm is a tall, fast-growing palm that can reach heights of over 50 feet. The Piru Queen Palm is native to Brazil, but has been introduced to many other parts of the world, including Arizona.

The Piru Queen Palm is a popular landscape palm in Arizona due to its fast growth rate and tolerance for desert conditions. It is commonly used as a street tree or in large landscapes.

The Piru Queen Palm has a single, slender trunk that is covered with dark green leaves. The leaves are palmate (fan-shaped) and can be up to three feet wide. The leaflets are edged with sharp spines.

The Piru Queen Palm produces yellow flowers that bloom in the spring. These flowers are followed by small, round fruits that turn red when they ripe.

The Piru Queen Palm is a relatively low-maintenance palm and does not require much care once it is established. It is drought-tolerant and can tolerate occasional freezing temperatures.

11. Pygmy Date Palms (Phoenix roebelenii).

Native to southeast Asia, these petite palms are frequently used as houseplants or in office buildings. They grow slowly to about 20 feet and have a slender trunk with dense, glossy green leaves.

Pygmy Date Palms are one of the most popular palm trees in Arizona because they are low-maintenance and can tolerate a wide range of conditions.

12. Sago Palms (Cycas revoluta).

Sago palms are not really palms at all, but rather a type of cycad. Sago palms are dioecious, meaning that there are male and female plants. The female plants produce the bright red seeds which are poisonous if ingested.

All parts of the plant contain toxins that can cause liver failure in dogs and other animals if eaten. The sago palm is native to Japan and was introduced to the United States in the 1800s as an ornamental plant.

Sago palms are popular landscaping plants in Arizona because they are drought-tolerant and require little care once established. However, sago palms are considered invasive in some areas of the state.

13. Windmill Palms (Trachycarpus fortune).

They are one of the most popular palms in Arizona. The windmill palm is a small to medium sized palm that can grow up to 30 feet tall.

The leaves are dark green and have a silver-gray color on the underside. The flowers are white and blooming occurs from late spring to early summer. The fruit is black and ripens in late summer.

The windmill palm is native to China and was introduced into the United States in the late 1800s. It is hardy in USDA zones seven through ten and prefers full sun to partial shade.

The windmill palm is drought tolerant once it is established and can tolerate frost down to 15 degrees Fahrenheit. It is an excellent choice for a specimen plant or for use in a tropical landscape.

How to care for palm trees in Arizona.

Palm trees are a beautiful addition to any home, but they can be tricky to care for. If you live in Arizona, it’s important to know how to properly care for your palm trees so they stay healthy and thrive.

Here are a few tips on how to care for palm trees in Arizona:

– water them regularly, especially during the hot summer months

– fertilize them twice a year, in the spring and fall

– protect them from cold weather by wrapping them in burlap or plastic

– trim their fronds regularly to keep them looking neat and tidy

By following these simple tips, you can ensure that your palm trees stay healthy and thrive in Arizona’s hot climate.

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FAQs

How much do palm trees cost in Arizona?

The cost of palm trees in Arizona can vary depending on the type and size of tree that you are looking for. However, on average, a palm tree will cost between $100 and $200. If you are looking for a more exotic or rare type of palm tree, the cost can be upwards of $1000.

When purchasing a palm tree, it is important to consider the cost of maintenance and upkeep. Palm trees require regular watering and trimming in order to stay healthy and looking their best.

The cost of palm trees in Arizona is an investment that will pay off for years to come. With proper care, your palm tree can provide years of enjoyment.

Do palm trees grow well in Arizona?

Arizona is a great place for palm trees! The warm climate and desert soil make it an ideal location for these tropical plants. There are many different types of palm trees that can be found in Arizona, including the saguaro cactus palm and the Mexican blue fan palm.

How fast do palm trees grow in Arizona?

In fact, the average palm tree can take anywhere from 15 to 20 years to reach its full height.

This is due to the fact that most palm trees are grown in tropical regions where the climate is conducive to fast growth.

However, there are some species of palms that can grow quite quickly in the right conditions.

The Canary Island Date Palm, for example, has been known to grow up to 12 feet in a single year.

Conclusion

There are many different types of palm trees that can thrive in the Arizona climate. If you are looking to add a touch of paradise to your yard, consider planting one of these beautiful and unique trees. From the stately saguaro to the iconic palm, there is sure to be a tree that is perfect for you and your home.