29 Weeds with Yellow Flowers: Identification and Removal Tips

If you have a garden, then you know that weeds can be a major problem. Not only do they take away valuable space and sunlight from your plants, but they can also be difficult to remove. One type of weed that can be particularly troublesome is the weed with yellow flowers. In this blog post, we will discuss the identification and removal tips for this type of weed.

1. Bird’s Foot Trefoil (Lotus corniculatus).

Also known as Eggs and Bacon, Bird’s Foot Trefoil is a common weed in lawns, gardens and waste areas. It is a member of the pea family and has small yellow flowers that appear in early summer.

The leaves are divided into three narrow leaflets. The seed pods resemble bird’s feet with their curved shape and small size.

Bird’s Foot Trefoil is a hardy weed that can grow in most soil types. It is tolerant of drought and shade but prefers full sun. This weed can spread rapidly by seed and will often self-seed in lawns and gardens.

To control Bird’s Foot Trefoil, hand-pulling is the best method. This weed is easy to pull from moist soil. If the soil is dry, you may need to dig up the plant to remove the entire root system. Be sure to dispose of all plant material in a trash bag so it doesn’t spread further.

You can also control Bird’s Foot Trefoil by mowing your lawn regularly. This will prevent the weed from going to seed. Be sure to bag the clippings so the seeds don’t spread.

Herbicides can also be used to control Bird’s Foot Trefoil. For best results, use a glyphosate-based herbicide in early spring before the weed flowers.

Apply the herbicide to dry leaves and avoid spraying it on desirable plants. Be sure to read and follow all label directions when using any pesticide.

2. Black Medic (Medicago lupulina).

Black medic is a small blackish-brown member of the pea family that can be found in lawns, gardens, and waste areas. It has small yellow flowers that bloom in the summer. The plant gets its name from its dark color and its resemblance to a black horse’s hoof.

Black Medic is considered a weed because it can crowd out other plants in your garden. It is also difficult to remove because of its deep taproot.

To remove black medic from your garden, dig up the plant using a shovel or trowel. Be sure to get as much of the root as possible. You can then dispose of the plant in the trash. If you have a large infestation of black medic, you may need to use a herbicide.

If you have black medic in your lawn, you can remove it by mowing over it repeatedly. This will wear down the plant and eventually kill it. You can also apply a herbicide to black medics in your lawn.

3. Black-Eyed Susans (Rudbeckia hirta).

Also called black-eyed coneflowers, these sunny annuals are easy to identify by their deep green leaves and bright yellow flowers. Black-eyed Susans grow in full sun and reach a height of 24 inches. They’re perfect for adding color to any garden, and they’re also drought-tolerant once established.

To remove black-eyed Susans, simply dig up the entire plant, roots and all. You can also cut the flower heads off at the base of the plant if you’re looking to prevent them from reseeding.

4. Butterweed (Packera Glabella).

This is a common weed in the southeastern United States. The leaves are alternate, simple, and lanceolate shaped with smooth margins. The upper surface of the leaves are greenish-yellow while the lower surface is covered with fine hairs.

The flowers are yellow and borne on terminal racemes. Butterweed gets its name from the fact that the leaves and stems exude a yellow, buttery substance when broken.

This weed is most often found in pastures, meadows, and waste areas. It is tolerant of a wide range of soil types and prefers full sun to partial shade. Butterweed is not competitive with other plants and often invades disturbed areas.

Butterweed is a tap-rooted weed that can be difficult to control. The best time to control butterweed is in the fall when the plant is actively growing. Glyphosate herbicide applied at this time will give the best results.

If you have butterweed in your garden, you can remove it by hand-pulling or hoeing. Be sure to remove the entire root so that the plant does not regrow. You can also use a herbicide, but be careful not to damage your other plants.

5. Canada Goldenrod (Solidago canadensis).

This perennial can grow up to six feet tall and has small, yellow flowers that bloom in the summer and fall. Canada goldenrod is a common weed in lawns, gardens, and fields. It’s important to identify Canada goldenrod so you can remove it before it goes to seed and spreads.

There are several ways to remove Canada goldenrod from your property. You can hand-pull the weed, dig it up, or use a herbicide. If you’re using a herbicide, make sure to read the label and follow the instructions carefully.

When removing Canada goldenrod, be sure to wear gloves and long sleeves to protect your skin from the plant’s sharp edges.

6. Common Evening Primrose (Oenothera biennis).

This weed is also known as “Yellow Evening Primrose”, “Sundrops”, and “Large Yellow Evening Primrose”. It is a member of the family Onagraceae, which contains about 145 species of flowering plants native to temperate and tropical regions.

The plant grows to a height of 0.91-meter (36 in) with yellow flowers that bloom in the evening. The leaves are opposite, oblong-lanceolate, and measure up to 12 centimeters (47 in) long.

This weed is often found in roadsides, gardens, and other disturbed areas. It is native to Europe but has been introduced to North America, where it is considered an invasive species.

Common evening primrose is a biennial plant, meaning it takes two years to complete its life cycle. The first year, the plant grows leaves and a root system. The second year, the plant produces flowers and seeds before dying.

This weed is relatively easy to control because it has a shallow root system. Hand-pulling or hoeing the plant before it flowers and sets seed is the best way to remove it. Be sure to dispose of the plant material in a trash bag so that the seeds do not spread.

7. Common Ragwort (Senecio vulgaris).

This weed is commonly found in pastures and fields, along roadsides and railways. It is a member of the Daisy family (Asteraceae) and produces small yellow flowers from June to September.

The plant can grow up to one meter in height and has a deep taproot system. Common Ragwort is poisonous to horses, cattle, sheep and pigs and can cause liver damage.

If you suspect that your animal has ingested Common Ragwort, seek veterinary advice immediately.

To remove Common Ragwort from your property, dig up the plant including as much of the root system as possible. Dispose of the plant material in a plastic bag in the garbage. Repeat this process until the entire plant is removed. You may need to do this several times a year to prevent re-growth.

8. St. John’s-Wort (Hypericum perforatum).

This weed is common in disturbed areas, such as roadsides and construction sites. It has a strong taproot and can quickly spread to form large patches. The leaves are dark green and have small black dots on them. The flowers are bright yellow and have five petals.

The best time to remove St. John’s-Wort is in the fall. To remove this weed, you will need to dig up the root system. If the plant has already gone to seed, you can cut it down and then dig it up. Be sure to dispose of the plant material in a plastic bag so that it doesn’t spread.

9. Creeping Buttercup (Ranunculus repens).

Creeping buttercup is a member of the buttercup family. The plant is native to Europe, and has been introduced to North America and other parts of the world. Creeping Buttercup is a perennial herbaceous plant that spreads by means of creeping rhizomes.

The leaves are alternately arranged on the stem, and are compound, with three leaflets. The flowers are yellow, and borne singly or in clusters. The fruit is a cluster of achenes.

Creeping buttercup is considered to be a weed in many parts of the world, as it can spread rapidly and crowd out other plants. The plant is toxic to humans and animals if ingested in large quantities. Creeping buttercup can be controlled by physical removal, and by the use of herbicides.

10. Creeping Cinquefoil (Potentilla reptans).

This weed is also known as Creeping Five-Finger and is a member of the rose family. It has leaves that are deeply divided into five leaflets, which explains its other nickname. The leaflets have toothed edges and are arranged on long, slender stalks.

The flowers have five yellow petals and appear in early summer. This weed is a creeping perennial, meaning it will come back year after year.

It spreads by both seed and runners (horizontal stems that grow along the ground). Creeping Cinquefoil is found in lawns, gardens, and other areas with full sun and well-drained soil.

To remove this weed from your garden, pull it up by the root or dig it out with a shovel. You can also use a hoe to cut off the weed at ground level, but be sure to do this before it flowers and produces seed.

If you have a large area infested with Creeping Cinquefoil, you may need to use a herbicide. Glyphosate (Roundup) is effective, but be sure to follow the label directions carefully. You’ll also need to reapply it several times during the growing season.

11. Cypress Spurge (Euphorbia cyparissias).

This yellow-flowered weed is a member of the Euphorbiaceae, or spurge, family. It’s an annual that reproduces by seed. The plant gets its common name from its resemblance to cypress trees (Cupressus spp.), which are also in the Euphorbiaceae family.

Cypress spurge is native to Europe and was introduced to North America as an ornamental plant.

Cypress spurge is a problem in lawns, gardens, and other areas where it’s not wanted because it’s difficult to control. The plant contains a poisonous sap that can cause skin irritation and eye damage. It also spreads rapidly by seed.

To remove cypress spurge from your landscape, dig up the plants or pull them up by hand. Be sure to wear gloves and long sleeves to protect your skin from the plant’s sap. You can also use a chemical herbicide, but be sure to follow the manufacturer’s instructions carefully.

12. Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale).

This broadleaf weed has been invading lawns for centuries. The deep taproot makes removal difficult, but not impossible. Hand-pulling is the best method to remove dandelions.

You can also use a shovel or garden fork to loosen the soil around the taproot and then pull it out of the ground. Be sure to remove as much of the taproot as possible to prevent regrowth.

For a more chemical approach, you can use herbicides that contain glyphosate. Glyphosate is a non-selective herbicide, so it will kill any plant it comes in contact with.

You can either spot treat individual dandelions or treat your entire lawn with a lawn weed killer. Be sure to follow the manufacturer’s instructions carefully when using herbicides.

If you have dandelions in your lawn, you’re not alone. These pesky weeds are difficult to remove, but with a little patience and effort, you can get rid of them for good.

Hand-pulling is the best method for removing dandelions, but you can also use a shovel or garden fork to loosen the soil around the taproot and then pull it out. For a more chemical approach, you can use herbicides that contain glyphosate.

Glyphosate is a non-selective herbicide, so it will kill any plant it comes in contact with. You can either spot treat individual dandelions or treat your entire lawn with a lawn weed killer. Be sure to follow the manufacturer’s instructions carefully when using herbicides.

13. Garden Loosestrife (Lysimachia Vulgaris).

This perennial weed can grow up to three feet tall and produces small yellow flowers. The leaves are lance-shaped and grow in opposite pairs. Garden loosestrife is common in damp areas such as stream banks, ditches, and wet meadows. It spreads rapidly by seed and rhizomes (underground stems).

To remove garden loosestrife, pull up the plant by the roots and dispose of it in the trash. You can also dig up the rhizomes to prevent regrowth. For large infestations, herbicides may be necessary.

14. Golden Clover (Trifolium aureum).

This is a common weed in lawns and gardens. The leaves are dark green and the flowers are yellow. The plant can grow to be about two feet tall.

To remove this weed, you will need to pull it up by the roots. You can also use a herbicide that contains glyphosate. Be sure to follow the directions on the label.

You can prevent this weed from growing by mowing your lawn regularly and keeping it free of leaves and other debris. You should also fertilize your lawn regularly.

15. Lesser Celandine (Ficaria verna).

Lesser celandine is a low-growing, perennial plant that is native to Europe and Asia. It was introduced to North America in the 1800s as an ornamental plant, and it has since become naturalized in many states.

Lesser celandine is considered an invasive species in some areas because it can spread rapidly and crowd out native plants.

The plant has dark green, heart-shaped leaves and small, yellow flowers that bloom in early spring. Lesser celandine is often found growing in woodlands, along streams, and in other damp habitats.

This plant can be a difficult to control because it reproduces both vegetatively (by spreading its roots) and sexually (by producing seeds). The best time to control lesser celandine is in late summer or early fall, before it goes to seed.

If you have this plant growing on your property, you can remove it by pulling it up by the roots or digging it out with a shovel. Be sure to dispose of the plant material in a trash bag so that it doesn’t spread to other areas. You may need to reapply herbicide multiple times to prevent regrowth.

16. Marsh Yellowcress (Rorippa palustris)

Marsh yellowcress is a member of the mustard family, Brassicaceae. It is an annual herb that grows in wet areas, such as marshes, ditches and other damp habitats.

This plant can be identified by its yellow flowers and oblong leaves.

To remove this weed, hand-pulling or hoeing is the best method. Be sure to remove the entire plant, including the roots. You can also try using a herbicide that contains glyphosate.

If you have this weed in your garden, it is best to remove it as soon as possible. Left unchecked, it can quickly spread and become a nuisance.

17. Narrow-Leaf Plantain (Plantago lanceolata).

This weed is easily identified by its long, narrow leaves that grow close to the ground. The leaves are dark green in color and have a ribs running down the center. The plantain also has small, white flowers that grow in clusters at the base of the leaves.

To remove this weed, you can either pull it up by hand or use a weed wacker. If you choose to pull it up by hand, make sure to get the entire root so it doesn’t grow back. If you’re using a weed wacker, cut the plant at ground level and dispose of the debris.

18. Oxalis (Wood sorrels).

These common weeds have three heart-shaped leaves and small yellow flowers. They are most often found in lawns, gardens, and cracks in sidewalks. Oxalis is a difficult weed to control because it can reproduce from both seeds and bulbs.

The best way to remove oxalis is to dig it up by hand, making sure to get all the bulbs. You can also try spot-treating with a glyphosate herbicide, but be careful not to damage your other plants.

Oxalis is a difficult weed to control because it can reproduce from both seeds and bulbs. The best way to remove oxalis is to dig it up by hand, making sure to get all the bulbs. You can also try spot-treating with a glyphosate herbicide, but be careful not to damage your other plants.

If you have oxalis in your lawn or garden, don’t despair. With a little patience and effort, you can get rid of these pesky weeds for good.

19. Purslane (Portulaca oleracea).

Purslane has smooth, fleshy leaves that are often tinged with red or purple. The plant produces yellow flowers and forms a rosette at the base of the stem. Purslane is a common weed in gardens and lawns. It is difficult to control because it can reproduce from seeds, stems, and leaves.

To remove purslane from your garden, pull it up by the roots or dig it out with a hoe. You can also use a weedkiller that contains glyphosate. Be sure to follow the directions on the label.

Purslane is edible and can be added to salads or cooked as a vegetable. The leaves are high in vitamins A and C, and the seeds are a good source of omega-three fatty acids.

20. Skeletonweed (Chondrilla Juncea).

Skeletonweed is a member of the daisy family and is native to Europe. It was introduced to North America in the early 1900s as a contaminant in alfalfa seed.

Skeletonweed is an annual or biennial herb that reproduces by seed. Each plant can produce up to 12,000 seeds per season, which are easily dispersed by wind, water, animals, and humans.

Skeletonweed is a problem in both agricultural and non-agricultural areas. In agricultural fields, it can reduce crop yields by up to 90%. In gardens and landscaped areas, it invades turfgrass, flower beds, and natural areas.

21. Spanish Broom (Spartium Junceum).

Spanish broom is an evergreen shrub that grows to about 15 feet in height. It has long, slender branches with small, dark green leaves. The flowers are yellow and appear in clusters at the tips of the branches. The fruit is a small, dry capsule that contains seeds.

Spanish broom is native to southern Europe and northern Africa. It was introduced into the United States in the early 1800s as an ornamental plant. It is now found throughout the southern and western states, as well as Hawaii and Puerto Rico.

Spanish broom is considered an invasive species in many parts of the United States. It can displace native plants, change fire regimes, and increase soil erosion. It is also toxic to humans and animals if ingested.

The best way to control Spanish broom is to prevent it from spreading. If you have it on your property, remove it before it flowers and sets seed. Pull up the plants by the roots or cut them back to the ground.

You can also mow them regularly to prevent them from flowering and setting seed. Dispose of the plants in a landfill or burn them. Do not compost them.

If you are hiking in an area where Spanish broom is present, stay on the trail and do not pick the flowers or collect the seeds. This will help prevent its spread into new areas.

22. Wild Parsnip (Pastinaca sativa).

Wild parsnip is a member of the carrot family. It is a biennial plant, meaning it takes two years to complete its life cycle. The first year it grows leaves and a root system.

The second year it sends up a flower stalk that can grow up to six feet tall with yellow flowers that resemble Queen Anne’s lace. Wild parsnip is found in pastures, meadows, and along roadsides. It is considered a weed because it can crowd out other plants.

To remove wild parsnip, you need to dig up the root system. This can be difficult because the roots can be up to six feet long. You also need to be careful not to get any of the sap on your skin because it can cause a rash.

If you do get the sap on your skin, you should wash it off immediately and avoid exposure to sunlight for at least 48 hours.

23. Wild Radish (Raphanus raphanistrum).

Wild radish is an invasive weed in the Brassicaceae family. It is native to Europe and Asia, but has been introduced to North America, where it is now found in every province and state except Hawaii. Wild radish can grow up to two meters tall, and has large, yellow flowers. The leaves are alternate, with each leaf having three-to-seven lobes.

The stem is hairy and the flowers are borne in racemes. Wild radish is a problem weed because it can reduce crop yields, displace native vegetation, and increase soil erosion. It is especially problematic in organic farming systems, where it is difficult to control without herbicides.

If you have wild radish on your property, you will need to take action to remove it. The best time to remove wild radish is in the spring, before it flowers. You can pull up the plants by hand, or use a hoe or trowel to dig them up.

Make sure to get all of the roots, as they will regrow if left in the ground. You can also mow wild radish, but this will only control it temporarily and it will likely regrow.

If you have a large infestation of wild radish, you may need to use herbicides to control it. Be sure to follow all label instructions when using herbicides.

24. Wintercress (Barbarea Vulgaris).

Wintercress is a winter annual weed that is easily identified by its bright yellow flowers. The flowers bloom in early spring and are followed by seed pods that contain four to six seeds each.

Wintercress can be found growing in fields, gardens, and along roadsides. This weed is most commonly found in the northeastern United States.

Wintercress is a difficult weed to control once it has established itself in an area. The best way to prevent this weed from becoming a problem is to remove it before it blooms and sets seed.

To remove wintercress, dig up the plant with a shovel or hoe and dispose of it in a plastic bag. Be sure to wear gloves when handling this plant, as it can cause skin irritation.

If you have already allowed wintercress to bloom and set seed in your garden, you will need to take a more aggressive approach to removal. First, mow the plants down to the ground.

This will help prevent them from setting seed. Next, use a herbicide that contains glyphosate to kill the plants. Be sure to follow the directions on the herbicide label carefully.

25. Yellow Nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus).

Yellow nutsedge is a perennial sedge that reproduces by seed and rhizomes. It is native to Eurasia and Africa but has become naturalized in North America, where it is considered an invasive weed.

Yellow nutsedge typically grows in wet or moist areas, such as along waterways, in irrigated fields, and in landscapes. The plant is characterized by its yellow flowers, which bloom from June to August.

Yellow nutsedge is a difficult weed to control because of its ability to reproduce vegetatively from small pieces of rhizome. The best time to control yellow nutsedge is before it flowers and sets seed.

Hand-pulling can be effective if the entire plant, including the root system, is removed. However, because the plant can regenerate from small pieces of rhizome, it is important to dispose of pulled plants in a way that prevents them from spreading.

Mowing yellow nutsedge will not kill the plant but will prevent it from flowering and setting seed. Herbicides are effective but must be applied carefully to avoid harming desirable plants.

Glyphosate is effective on yellow nutsedge but will also kill any other plants it comes in contact with. Selective herbicides, such as imazapyr and fenoxaprop, can be used to control yellow nutsedge without harming other plants.

26. Yellow Rocket (Narbarea vulgaris).

Yellow rocket is a weed that commonly appears in gardens and lawns. It is a member of the mustard family and has small, yellow flowers. The plant is invasive and can be difficult to remove. Here are some tips for identifying and removing yellow rocket:

-Yellow rocket can grow up to two feet tall.

-The leaves of the plant are green and have a toothed or lobed shape.

-The flowers of the yellow rocket are small and yellow, and they appear in clusters.

-The plant produces seed pods that contain numerous small seeds.

27. Yellow Salsify (Tragopogon dubius).

Yellow Salsify is a weed that commonly pops up in gardens and lawns. The plant has yellow flowers and long, thin leaves.

Yellow Salsify is a member of the Aster family, which also includes daisies and sunflowers. The weed is native to Europe but has been introduced to North America, where it is now found throughout the United States and Canada.

Yellow Salsify is a deep-rooted weed, so it can be difficult to remove. The best time to pull the weed is in early spring, before it flowers. If you can’t pull the weed, you can try spot-treating it with an herbicide that contains glyphosate. Be sure to follow the instructions on the herbicide label.

28. Yellow Sorrel (Oxalis stricta).

Yellow Sorrel is a perennial weed that commonly invades lawns, gardens, and other areas of the landscape. This weed is easily identified by its yellow flowers and clover-like leaves. Yellow Sorrel reproduces by seed and can spread quickly if not controlled.

To remove Yellow Sorrel from your landscape, hand-pulling is the best method. Be sure to pull up the entire plant, including the root system. For large infestations, you may need to use a garden hoe or other tool to loosen the soil before pulling.

29. Yellow Toadflax (Linaria Vulgaris).

Yellow Toadflax is a perennial weed that can grow up to two feet tall. The leaves are long and narrow, with a pointed tip. The flowers are bright yellow and clustered at the top of the plant. Toadflax blooms from May to September.

Toadflax is native to Europe and Asia, but it has been introduced to North America. Toadflax is found in every province and state in the continental United States.

Toadflax prefers sunny locations with well-drained soil. It is often found in gardens, along roadsides, and in disturbed areas.

Yellow toadflax is a troublesome weed because it is difficult to control. Once established, toadflax is difficult to remove from an area.

The best time to control toadflax is in the spring, before it blooms. Try to pull up the entire plant, root and all. If you can’t get the whole plant, cut the stem near ground level and apply a herbicide to the cut surface. Be sure to follow the label directions when using herbicides.

Toadflax is a pretty weed, but it can be a real nuisance in the garden. With a little patience and persistence, you can get rid of toadflax and enjoy a weed-free garden.

Related: 11 Weeds with Purple Flowers: Identification and Removal Tips

Conclusion

In conclusion, while there are many different types of weeds with yellow flowers, dandelions are by far the most common. If you’re looking to identify a weed in your garden, chances are it’s a dandelion.

However, there are a few other types of yellow-flowering weeds that you should be aware of. These include plantain, chickweed, and ground ivy. If you’re unsure of what type of weed you’re dealing with, it’s always best to consult with a professional. A certified nursed or landscaper will be able to help you identify the weed and suggest the best course of action for removal.

We hope this article was helpful in identifying the weed in your garden! If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to reach out to us. We’re always happy to help!

What’s the best way to get rid of weeds with yellow flowers?

The best way to get rid of weeds with yellow flowers is by pulling them up from the root.